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Water: Discussion
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 Group admin 
Discuss water techniques , and explain how to use them here.
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| July 29, 2014, 9:44 pm
 Group admin 
There are many different water techniques that you can use. One is SNOT technique, which can be done by making wall of blue bricks then connecting them with SNOT. Blake Baer shows us an example of how this technique can be used well http://www.mocpages.com/image_zoom.php?mocid=225784&id=/user_images/29890/12843309208

Another method is the tile method. With this method you can use trans-blue tiles to create a glossy smooth looking lake. Once again, Blake Baer shows us how this method can be used to perfection http://www.mocpages.com/image_zoom.php?mocid=375137&id=/user_images/29890/1385513765m

A third technique is the clear plate method. Basically all this is, is laying out an area with blue plates for the water then covering that area with clear plates. I bet you can guess who gives us a good example of this...yup the one and only Blake Baer http://www.mocpages.com/image_zoom.php?mocid=284409&id=/user_images/29890/1337696852m

Another method is very simple, but still works well. The stud method. All this is, is taking a large quantity of trans-clear/blue/light blue studs (bricklink is a fine solution for lack of hundreds of these little bricks) and just dumping them out. Halhi shows us this technique in use here http://www.mocpages.com/image_zoom.php?mocid=389121&id=/user_images/84200/1401075515m


As far as which method is the best, that is entirely up to you. Whatever you thinks looks good.
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| July 29, 2014, 9:44 pm
 Group admin 
I wouldn't really recommend the fourth method unless you get the studs at PaB and they don't have trans square plates. Method three looks way better and is more complex/interesting
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| July 29, 2014, 9:58 pm
 Group admin 
Method 2 if you added some white studs randomly around the top it could pass for ice...
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| July 30, 2014, 7:22 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Halhi 141
I wouldn't really recommend the fourth method unless you get the studs at PaB and they don't have trans square plates. Method three looks way better and is more complex/interesting

I tend to you my clear plates for waterfalls...
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| July 30, 2014, 7:23 am
 Group admin 
Method 3 is my personal favorite, but I don't have enough clear plates to do a large section of water.
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| July 30, 2014, 9:39 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Kevin Moyer
Method 3 is my personal favorite, but I don't have enough clear plates to do a large section of water.

Same with me...I guess that's why we have BL and PaB :P
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| July 30, 2014, 9:40 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Thomas B.
I tend to you my clear plates for waterfalls...

:P
I'm going to my local Lego store next week and according to Stephen it has clear 1x1 plates, so I'll probably get a bunch of them...
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| July 30, 2014, 10:00 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Thomas B.
Same with me...I guess that's why we have BL and PaB :P

Definitely. I'm planning a big BL order soon, and I hope to get some.
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| July 30, 2014, 10:07 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Halhi 141
:P
I'm going to my local Lego store next week and according to Stephen it has clear 1x1 plates, so I'll probably get a bunch of them...

Lucky...
Permalink
| July 30, 2014, 10:40 am
Here's my example of #3 with a couple trans-blue studs mixed in. http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/393682
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| July 30, 2014, 6:31 pm
Here is a very interesting water technique I saw today. Probably very parts intensive, but the end result is awesome. https://www.flickr.com/photos/buildingsblockd/14450285870/
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| July 30, 2014, 11:23 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Legomania .
Here is a very interesting water technique I saw today. Probably very parts intensive, but the end result is awesome. https://www.flickr.com/photos/buildingsblockd/14450285870/

Holy smokes, that's fantastic!!
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| July 31, 2014, 11:17 am
 Group admin 
I'm trying out Grant Davis' method, of building on a white surface and laying out 1x2 trans-light blue tiles for water...just like the water in this MOC http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/392565
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| July 31, 2014, 11:20 am
 Group admin 
I came up with a technique for moving waves here: http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/415769
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| July 6, 2015, 8:25 pm
My Tug-in-a-Jug at http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/403116 illustrates another (serendipitous) method similar to making a layer of loose 1x1 round plates: Use blue 3L friction pins or 2L axle pins instead. Shaking the layer horizontally causes the pins to settle into a semi-ordered 3D texture evoking the surface of the ocean in various sea states.
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| July 7, 2015, 2:57 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Halhi 141
I came up with a technique for moving waves here: http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/415769

Holy shrimp....Wow.
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| July 21, 2015, 9:12 am
 Group admin 
Using medium azure plates with clear 1x1s on top looks really pwitty.
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| July 21, 2015, 9:13 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Thomas .
Using medium azure plates with clear 1x1s on top looks really pwitty.

Yep! That's my favorite technique. And by changing the color of the plates/bricks underneath, you can give the water a sense of depth. Also, a lighter shade of blue under clear plates can give a nice frozen look.
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| July 26, 2015, 11:55 am
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