MOCpages : Share your LEGO® creations
LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop Technique Exchange Group
Welcome to the world's greatest LEGO fan community!
Explore cool creations, share your own, and have lots of fun together.  ~  It's all free!
Conversation »
Photography Setups
Join to comment
Discuss your photography setups here.
Permalink
| August 4, 2014, 12:36 pm
 Group admin 
I now use two large white posters, with a lamp.
Permalink
| August 4, 2014, 12:39 pm
I have two decently sized poster-boards that I use for my setups, grey and white. The color depends on which I think fits the build better. I usually place my setup on a bright, cloudy or sunny day, or under my houses skylights, though the latter is usually for smaller builds. This will usually end up in a pretty bright picture with a pure white or grey background. If the photo is too dark, I'll simply brighten in an editing program. It also usually gives the background its pure white color.
Permalink
| August 4, 2014, 12:44 pm
 Group admin 
I have two sheets of standard white poster board that I bought from Walmart. There's a room in my house with a lot of natural light (skylights, large windows), so I put the poster board up in a spot the sun isn't shining on directly. This gives me a uniform light grey background with some nice diffused lighting and small shadows. I then use Gimp to brighten up the image. Take a look at the group banner (which I made) to see what the final result looks like. This setup works for me, it's easy, I didn't have to spend an arm and a leg on elaborate lighting, and the final result looks quite nice.
Permalink
| August 4, 2014, 3:46 pm
 Group admin 
For white backgrounds, I have a ton of pieces of A3 paper that I use. I photograph MOCs on the same table I build on, which is convenient so that I don't have to move large/heavy/fragile MOCs. After photographing, I do some basic touching up pixlr and picmonkey.

I also sometimes like to use a light blue background from a few pieces of construction paper.
Permalink
| August 4, 2014, 6:45 pm
I'm very bad at photo editing and only ever bother editing the main photo (it takes forever, there must be a quicker way). I use lots of A3 thick sheets, blu tack and a large white sheet from a mindstorms set. I use my lamp for light and use a compact camera at max resolution
Permalink
| August 9, 2014, 4:07 am
 Group admin 
Quoting That guy you saw earlier
I'm very bad at photo editing and only ever bother editing the main photo (it takes forever, there must be a quicker way).

What program do you use? I recommend Gimp. I can edit each picture in about 30 seconds. All I do is increase both the contrast and the brightness, and the picture becomes much crisper, and the background is removed (assuming you're using a featureless white background).
Permalink
| August 9, 2014, 9:22 am
I use a large, white poster board for taking my pictures. I'm still trying to find something to use as a black background.
Permalink
| August 10, 2014, 5:27 pm
 Group moderator 
Quoting Mark McPeek
I use a large, white poster board for taking my pictures. I'm still trying to find something to use as a black background.

Have you tried a black bed sheet?
Permalink
| August 10, 2014, 5:40 pm
Quoting Mark McPeek
I use a large, white poster board for taking my pictures. I'm still trying to find something to use as a black background.

Black posterboard. It's like "what is blue and smells like red paint?" Blue paint! But yeah, black posterboard.
Permalink
| August 10, 2014, 7:37 pm
 Group moderator 
I have two big white poster boards that I use for large mocs, and also two large black sheets of poster paper that I lay over the poster boards for black backgrounds. For smaller builds, I can sometimes just use a DIN A3 paper. I also sometimes use light blue backgrounds if white or black both won't work that well, and occasionally I have some fun with bright pink paper as a background, but that only works for small vignettes.
I usually take pictures at the biggest windows in the house (facing east), and I either take pictures on overcast days or after the sun has moved far enough so that my spot doesn't get weird shadows. If the build is small enough, I can just situate myself so that my shadow covers the whole build, or better yet, all the background in the picture as well, and then I can take pictures anytime. Sometimes I take pictures quickly before the sun comes over the hills in the east, but that usually only works in winter.
I also like to take pictures with cool lighting from above or below, and I'll usually take those in the evening in my room.
Permalink
| August 10, 2014, 9:28 pm
I'm not a professional photographer, and pretty much only use the ground next to the side of my house as the setting for photos.
Permalink
| August 10, 2014, 11:14 pm
Quoting Timothy Post
Have you tried a black bed sheet?

To many wrinkles... ;)

Quoting MCLegoboy !
Black posterboard. It's like "what is blue and smells like red paint?" Blue paint! But yeah, black posterboard.


Ok, thanks! I'll have to see about getting one. Problem is that I've never seen one that I liked...
Permalink
| August 11, 2014, 12:03 am
 Group admin 
Quoting MCLegoboy !
Black posterboard. It's like "what is blue and smells like red paint?" Blue paint! But yeah, black posterboard.

I'm too cheap to buy anything specifically for photography, I just use whatever I find xD I have a ton of paper in various sizes and colors, so...
Permalink
| August 11, 2014, 12:12 am
Quoting Kevin Moyer
What program do you use? I recommend Gimp. I can edit each picture in about 30 seconds. All I do is increase both the contrast and the brightness, and the picture becomes much crisper, and the background is removed (assuming you're using a featureless white background).

I use GIMP. I have to add an alpha channel and then remove all the background around my subject before adding a space background.
Permalink
| August 11, 2014, 4:18 am
Quoting Mark McPeek
Ok, thanks! I'll have to see about getting one. Problem is that I've never seen one that I liked...

Yeah, I know. I went to an art store and probably paid too much but I wasn't going to worry since I got it and have been using it for awhile now.
Permalink
| August 11, 2014, 6:58 am
 Group admin 
Quoting That guy you saw earlier
I use GIMP. I have to add an alpha channel and then remove all the background around my subject before adding a space background.

Hmm, yeah. That would be a pain. If your picture's background is all one color, the fuzzy select tool might work better than doing it manually. I haven't found a good way to do that. You could check out the "it isn't rocket surgery" group for more advice. I'm honestly not the best person to ask.
Permalink
| August 11, 2014, 9:25 am
I generally use a large sheet of white paper and tape it to a wall so that it covers the wall and a section of the table against the wall that I use. This way the paper sort of curves from vertical to horizontal with not obvious corner of where it switches. Then I usually use a small canon digital camera (I can't think of the specific model at the moment), and I attach it to either a mini or regular tripod depending on the size of the moc. I use 2 ikea flexible lights (or 3 if it's necessary) to light the moc from both sides so as to eliminate shadows. To give mocs cool lighting or different tones I will sometimes use low light and light the scene only with a light brick or I'll tape a translucent piece over the light ( like I show in this post http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/394414 ) in order to make a sort of home made filter. Lastly I forgot to mention the spot where I take most of my pictures has a window a few feet to the right so I get a lot of natural light as well.
Permalink
| August 12, 2014, 7:50 am
I recently finished making my own lightbox. The box can be as big as you want, but the entire inside has to be covered in white paper or cloth. A square has to be cut out of the top so that the lamp can push the light in. I use a florescent lightbulb because I think it produces the best results. But a better description would be here.

http://www.wikihow.com/Create-an-Inexpensive-Photography-Lightbox

It's done wonders for my past few mocs for GoH.
Permalink
| August 12, 2014, 10:42 am
Quoting Kevin Moyer
Hmm, yeah. That would be a pain. If your picture's background is all one color, the fuzzy select tool might work better than doing it manually. I haven't found a good way to do that. You could check out the "it isn't rocket surgery" group for more advice. I'm honestly not the best person to ask.

I do that already ;) Maybe there isn't a way
Permalink
| August 13, 2014, 2:32 am
I use a white sheet or a poster beside a large glass window (You can go outside if you want to) which gives a clear photo like this http://www.mocpages.com/image_zoom.php?mocid=395107&id=/user_images/82143/1408396115m
Permalink
| August 27, 2014, 5:17 pm
I am being serious here, my pictures are dreadful! Sometimes I am lucky and get a good picture though. I use a blue blanket for my background and take my pictures with my tablet by a fairly large window. Sometimes I turn on the lihgts as well.
Permalink
| September 1, 2014, 5:47 am
Quoting Mitchell Long
I use a white sheet or a poster beside a large glass window (You can go outside if you want to) which gives a clear photo like this http://www.mocpages.com/image_zoom.php?mocid=395107&id=/user_images/82143/1408396115m

I wait until about 5pm then go outside and take my photos, it's the best lighting you can get (or at least in summer).
Permalink
| September 1, 2014, 5:52 am
I use a load of A3 pieces of paper, usually sellotaped up to the side of my house, outside in the evening. I use the Flickr photo editing program to auto-enhance, brighten and adjust saturation, contrast, sharpness and warmth accordingly.
Permalink
| September 1, 2014, 5:56 am
Black paper/card works fine for black backgrounds. I never edit my photos.
Permalink
| September 1, 2014, 1:52 pm
Quoting Starscream Soundwave
Black paper/card works fine for black backgrounds. I never edit my photos.

I tend to have to make the photo a bit darker to make my black background actually black but the great thing about the black background, it's harder to get a yellow tint on your picture than when the background is white.
Permalink
| September 2, 2014, 2:47 pm
Quoting MCLegoboy !
I tend to have to make the photo a bit darker to make my black background actually black but the great thing about the black background, it's harder to get a yellow tint on your picture than when the background is white.

Fair enough, I suppose if you want a jet black background you'd have to do some editing. I leave everything as it is, and, depending on the colour of the creation, the background is usually a greyer colour.
Permalink
| September 2, 2014, 3:42 pm
So, what is the BEST (and free) photo-editing program for a computer is your guys' opinion(s)? I tried GIMP, but it was a little more complex than what I wanted to do, which is to simply just touch-up some LEGO photos and make the background look spotless.
Permalink
| September 7, 2014, 5:24 pm
Quoting BrickBuilder7622 .
So, what is the BEST (and free) photo-editing program for a computer is your guys' opinion(s)? I tried GIMP, but it was a little more complex than what I wanted to do, which is to simply just touch-up some LEGO photos and make the background look spotless.

Pirated Photoshop :P
Permalink
| September 7, 2014, 7:48 pm
Quoting BrickBuilder7622 .
So, what is the BEST (and free) photo-editing program for a computer is your guys' opinion(s)? I tried GIMP, but it was a little more complex than what I wanted to do, which is to simply just touch-up some LEGO photos and make the background look spotless.

Photoscape is what I have been using. It's simple and you can also do some cool stuff with it. I tend to use it for white balance to get the colors to look the most like their hues in the real world. You can also add some simple things like a border or text, and you can even use some filtering effects on the photo. Everything is labeled with actual words than just icons and it's completely free. I've never had a problem for simple stuff on it.
Permalink
| September 7, 2014, 7:50 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting BrickBuilder7622 .
So, what is the BEST (and free) photo-editing program for a computer is your guys' opinion(s)? I tried GIMP, but it was a little more complex than what I wanted to do, which is to simply just touch-up some LEGO photos and make the background look spotless.

I use pixlr and picmonkey
Permalink
| September 7, 2014, 7:52 pm
Quoting MCLegoboy !
Photoscape is what I have been using. It's simple and you can also do some cool stuff with it. I tend to use it for white balance to get the colors to look the most like their hues in the real world. You can also add some simple things like a border or text, and you can even use some filtering effects on the photo. Everything is labeled with actual words than just icons and it's completely free. I've never had a problem for simple stuff on it.

You seem like the right person to ask. What kind of camera should I save up for?
Permalink
| September 7, 2014, 7:53 pm
Quoting Sam .
You seem like the right person to ask. What kind of camera should I save up for?

I saved up Graduation Money back in 2012 for a Canon Powershot 300 HS. 1:1 3:2 4:3 and 16:9 Pictures, HD Video, a ton of other camera effects that I don't even use. It comes with an uplaoder cable, battery and charger, and a memory card but I don't know what mine came with.

I believe it can handle a 32gb SD card (I bought a 16gb since it was cheaper and was well more than I needed), and I suggest you get an extra battery for it. My only big complaint is that mine seems to not want to shoot more than 10 minutes of video and that it only bothersome because I make review videos and like my videos to be more than 10 minutes. I'm pretty sure everything I got was about $200? It's been a few years. I know I had $400+ that year I graduated but I know I didn't spennd it all on the camera.
Permalink
| September 7, 2014, 8:03 pm
Quoting Sam .
You seem like the right person to ask. What kind of camera should I save up for?

Get rid of whatever phone you have and get an Android with a 5-megapixel camera minimum (8 megapixels gives you awesome photos). The photography app on Androids is vastly superior to the Apple version, and works great on small objects. Unfortunately, it doesn't work that well in low-light conditions, but my phones have never really let me down once I figured out all of their settings.
Permalink
| September 7, 2014, 8:10 pm
SLR cameras undoubtably produce the best results, but there are many devices capable of taking perfectly acceptable photographs.
Permalink
| September 7, 2014, 8:34 pm
I personally use an ancient Canon EOS 20D. It's an oldie, but with the 17-85mm canon lens, the pictures turn out pretty nice. My setup is usually a large, dark blue card stock poster, put in my backyard. I usually try and take pictures when it's cloudy, but the shade from a tree works just as well.

I haven't used it recently, but if I do photoshop images, I usually use the standard, Adobe Photoshop Elements Editor.
Permalink
| September 13, 2014, 2:26 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Sam .
What kind of camera should I save up for?


My personal advice would be to never use phones for pictures of LEGO. Your pictures, unless your phone has an abnormally good camera, will end up like this: http://www.us.lego.com/en-us/starwars/gallery

I recently got a used (but still very good) Nikon D60 with a Nikkor 18-55 mm lens, and it's wonderful. DSLRs take awesome pictures! But pretty much any normal camera (preferably with 8 or higher megapixels) will work.

My advice is to delve deep into the settings of whatever camera you end up with and figure out how to control what the camera does. Often the default settings don't have the camera taking the biggest pictures it can, so if you fix that, the quality can be a lot better.
Permalink
| September 13, 2014, 2:51 pm
 Group admin 
Any tips on how to get a perfect white background?
Permalink
| October 4, 2014, 6:48 pm
 Group moderator 
Quoting Thomas B.
Any tips on how to get a perfect white background?

Photo editor
Permalink
| October 4, 2014, 7:28 pm
I use a white blanket, and a light. I like taking my pictures around noon, which gives good lighting to my MOC. I also don't use my zoom, because for me it makes the pictures blurry. I hope dat helps! :-)
Permalink
| October 4, 2014, 8:23 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Thomas B.
Any tips on how to get a perfect white background?

What Tim said. Get a featureless, colorless background (like white posterboard), and take pictures on that. Then, you can use various programs (like GIMP) to clean up the background. What I do is just increase both the contrast and brightness about 50%. That'll clean the pictures up nicely. That's the fastest and easiest way I've found to get nice pictures.
Permalink
| October 4, 2014, 10:15 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Kevin Moyer
What Tim said. Get a featureless, colorless background (like white posterboard), and take pictures on that. Then, you can use various programs (like GIMP) to clean up the background. What I do is just increase both the contrast and brightness about 50%. That'll clean the pictures up nicely. That's the fastest and easiest way I've found to get nice pictures.

I've got posterboard, I need better lighting though...
Permalink
| October 5, 2014, 10:14 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Thomas B.
I've got posterboard, I need better lighting though...

Do you have a room in your house with a lot of natural light? You could set it up there, and that gives pretty good lighting. Or, if not, you could set up outside on a cloudy day (or in the shade). Diffuse lighting is best, so there aren't any ugly shadows.
Permalink
| October 5, 2014, 1:08 pm
Since i am a teenager, and don't have a very good camera, I get my dad to take my photos. He does photography as a hobby. We use some large sheets of paper, and prop them up against a lounge or the wall. Then, I place my lego on there, he takes the photos, and bam. Great pictures.
Permalink
| October 6, 2014, 3:38 am
Quoting Brad Wilson
Since i am a teenager, and don't have a very good camera, I get my dad to take my photos. He does photography as a hobby. We use some large sheets of paper, and prop them up against a lounge or the wall. Then, I place my lego on there, he takes the photos, and bam. Great pictures.

How hard is it to hold still or get a tri-pod and press the button? You don't need your dad to take pictures for you. It just takes some practice. You'll figure out what makes good and not so good pictures.
Permalink
| October 6, 2014, 7:21 pm
I have to sheets of poster paper, one set on the floor and one set up length wise going vertically. If my MOC is any color but white, I use white, but I would use black for a white MOC. If it is daytime, I open my room's blinds and direct the light onto the MOC (this gets rid of ugly, yellow room light). If it is evening or nighttime, I shine my lamp light on it from a considerable distance. My camera is set on a tripod that I keep at eye level when I kneel down for the picture and see an angle. Afterwards, I do all my editing in Windows, cropping off bits of the wall that is not white, increasing the exposure (brightness of the white), changing contrast, shadows, and highlights, and some sharpness to the image. For further editing, I use Paint and Gimpshop, however make sure you can use the fancy uploader as the simple cannot handle edited photos.
Permalink
| October 7, 2014, 4:26 pm
So I was wondering, do any of you use light Boxes? And how do you make the background go away with picture editing? I only have the default picture editing, and don't know how to do that
Permalink
| January 20, 2015, 8:27 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Ethan J.
So I was wondering, do any of you use light Boxes? And how do you make the background go away with picture editing? I only have the default picture editing, and don't know how to do that

Light box? Not really. I use a sheet of white posterboard set up so
that it curves in the middle. Diffuse lighting is the best, to avoid
shadows. Setting it up outside in the shade on a sunny day would
work well. Then I try to keep as much of the picture as possible
against the white, and make sure to keep the MOC inside the
white. For editing, I use Gimp. Free and very powerful. For pictures
that have a white-ish background, you can just crank up both the
brightness and contrast about 40-50%. That turns the background
white but keeps the MOC pretty much the same.

Here's an example of what my pictures look like before: http://images.mocpages.com/user_images/108698/1421761525m_DISPLAY.jpg

and after: https://www.flickr.com/photos/127340419@N08/15084375522/
editing. That might work, but it really is a matter of experimenting
and finding out what works with your camera and lighting.
Permalink
| January 20, 2015, 9:16 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Ethan J.
So I was wondering, do any of you use light Boxes? And how do you make the background go away with picture editing? I only have the default picture editing, and don't know how to do that

Okay, I just photograph with a white paper background, no special lighting. For editing, it's taken a lot of practice over the last year or so, but basically I go into http://pixlr.com/editor, open the picture, and crop the picture. Next, I use the curves tool (under adjustment) to adjust the white balance a bit (don't do this to the point of making the lighting look weird though; this will make some parts of the background white, but not all of it in general). Finally, I use the magic wand tool and eraser tool (This is the hard part) to try and get any areas that I missed. After that, I open the edited image in picmonkey to adjust the sharpness and clarity a tiny bit (don't do it very much, otherwise it looks really bad), and picmonkey has the nice side effect of reducing the file size of the picture without really reducing the quality
Permalink
| January 20, 2015, 9:53 am
 Group admin 
Oh, and when I take the photos, here's a few important settings:

Macro
Flash off
Manual white balance (you can find this in some menu of your camera, it allows you to adjust the white balance of the photos by pointing your camera at the white paper and pressing some button. Very useful.
Permalink
| January 20, 2015, 9:55 am
Quoting Halhi 141
Oh, and when I take the photos, here's a few important settings:

Macro
Flash off
Manual white balance (you can find this in some menu of your camera, it allows you to adjust the white balance of the photos by pointing your camera at the white paper and pressing some button. Very useful.

Thanks, that's really helpful
Permalink
| January 23, 2015, 1:36 pm
Quoting Anthony F
What would you guys suggest for a background if I'm taking a picture of something mostly white?

Black, or make sure you don't edit the background so you get some slight variations in the background so that it is still white, but your MOC shows up.
Permalink
| January 29, 2015, 7:16 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Anthony F
What would you guys suggest for a background if I'm taking a picture of something mostly white?

Pretty much anything other than white. Black often looks good, but depending on the subject, blue or grey might also work well.
Permalink
| January 31, 2015, 3:28 pm
 Group moderator 
Quoting Anthony F
What would you guys suggest for a background if I'm taking a picture of something mostly white?

I have used gray, black, blue, and pink. :P The pink didn't work out, but everything else it a pretty good bet.
Permalink
| January 31, 2015, 8:21 pm
I like taking pictures on my dining room table or in the kitchen. Depends on the lighting. I use Gimp for editing photos. It has tons of features, but is still relatively simple to use. There's a photoediting group that has a thread to walk you through the basics. http://www.mocpages.com/group.php/13655
Permalink
| January 31, 2015, 8:33 pm
 Group admin 
What's the best way to use natural lighting? Also what are some good photo editors I can use? Right now I use paint and picmonkey.
Permalink
| February 7, 2015, 7:46 am
Quoting Thomas .
What's the best way to use natural lighting? Also what are some good photo editors I can use? Right now I use paint and picmonkey.

Paint.net is good as well, I have heard.
Permalink
| February 7, 2015, 9:27 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Thomas .
What's the best way to use natural lighting? Also what are some good photo editors I can use? Right now I use paint and picmonkey.

If there's a room in your house with lots of windows or skylights, that would be ideal. If not, you could just set it up outside in the shade somewhere.
Permalink
| February 7, 2015, 9:28 am
 Group admin 
Here's a pic I took with my sisters new camera:
http://images.mocpages.com/user_images/108963/1437691375m_SPLASH.jpg


Permalink
| July 24, 2015, 9:17 am
 Group admin 
I have a new photo setup! https://flic.kr/p/wwGaeh Thoughts? I think it's going to turn out really nicely.
Permalink
| July 27, 2015, 4:30 pm
My setup (which I wish to change as soon as I can. Is some plain white paper taped together on a old Risk board. I do my best to edit all the lines out after words but it doesn't usually work as well as I hoped
Permalink
| July 29, 2015, 2:21 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Kevin Moyer
I have a new photo setup! https://flic.kr/p/wwGaeh Thoughts? I think it's going to turn out really nicely.

Looks great Kevin! That should yield some good pictures for ya

Permalink
| July 29, 2015, 7:49 am
I took a cardboard box, put it on its side, took of the flaps, cut a hole in the left and right, then took paper and covered the bottom back and top with it, took some paper that light can go through and covered up the holes that i made earlier, the shine through paper is used as a defuser (something that will reduce the shine of light) and 2 normal desk lamps.
Permalink
| December 1, 2015, 6:57 pm
Quoting Kevin Moyer
I have a new photo setup! https://flic.kr/p/wwGaeh Thoughts? I think it's going to turn out really nicely.

I really like that! much more simple than my big clunky light box!
Permalink
| December 1, 2015, 6:59 pm
I put white paper behind my creations, use the light from the windows for lighting, and my photography sucks. I will only occasionally get something satisfactory. Anyone got any advice?
Permalink
| January 16, 2016, 3:15 pm
Quoting Brick Boy
I put white paper behind my creations, use the light from the windows for lighting, and my photography sucks. I will only occasionally get something satisfactory. Anyone got any advice?

Take outdoor pictures! They look really good. And maybe use poster board. That works very nicely.
Permalink
| January 16, 2016, 4:52 pm
Quoting Hildigrim Took
Take outdoor pictures! They look really good. And maybe use poster board. That works very nicely.

I never thought of that. Sounds like a pretty good idea.
Permalink
| January 16, 2016, 6:12 pm
I am looking for a new camera. I need something affordable. Any suggestions?
Permalink
| February 18, 2016, 9:44 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Brick Boy
I am looking for a new camera. I need something affordable. Any suggestions?

Don't get a canon powershot sd850 is :P
Permalink
| February 18, 2016, 10:23 pm
Quoting Halhi 141
Don't get a canon powershot sd850 is :P

It's funny because I was just looking at the MOTD and its a camera...
Permalink
| February 18, 2016, 10:32 pm
http://www.amazon.com/Sony-DSCW800-Digital-Camera-Black/dp/B00I8BIBCW/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_sims?ie=UTF8
I don't know anything about cameras. Does this look like a good one for photographing LEGO?
Permalink
| February 20, 2016, 1:25 pm
Quoting Brick Boy
http://www.amazon.com/Sony-DSCW800-Digital-Camera-Black/dp/B00I8BIBCW/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_sims?ie=UTF8
I don't know anything about cameras. Does this look like a good one for photographing LEGO?

It seems no better than mine. Your pictures are not particularly terribIe, but still some grainage going on. I mean, I have the same problem and had to photograph my latest MOCs like 3 times over. Happens. Always take photos at highest resolution and I think there is something about ISO speed...
Permalink
| February 20, 2016, 8:20 pm
Quoting Kevin Moyer
What program do you use? I recommend Gimp. I can edit each picture in about 30 seconds. All I do is increase both the contrast and the brightness, and the picture becomes much crisper, and the background is removed (assuming you're using a featureless white background).

As you can see in my creations, my wall is green.Is this suitable to use this Gimp program as well?
Permalink
| March 10, 2016, 12:08 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Johan van der Pluijm
As you can see in my creations, my wall is green.Is this suitable to use this Gimp program as well?

Yes, definitely. You can remove any background from a picture (if you have the time) by using the free select tool to draw all around the object, hitting select --> invert, and deleting that.

However, if you put the model on a sheet of white posterboard or large paper and use decent lighting, you can get the background to be perfectly white very quickly by messing with the brightness and contrast levels.

Hope that helps!
Permalink
| March 10, 2016, 1:09 pm
Quoting Kevin Moyer
Yes, definitely. You can remove any background from a picture (if you have the time) by using the free select tool to draw all around the object, hitting select --> invert, and deleting that.

However, if you put the model on a sheet of white posterboard or large paper and use decent lighting, you can get the background to be perfectly white very quickly by messing with the brightness and contrast levels.

Hope that helps!

Thank you! I'll give it a try with my next build
Permalink
| March 11, 2016, 2:10 am
Hello, I'm currently in need of some setup advice, i seem to have lost my light box (that didn't work to well in the first place)

So I need a new one. I'm thinking something that is easily movable and with ajustable siz, any suggestion?

I also have 2 lamps, which I might need to replace, cause they don't work all that well together.
Permalink
| June 19, 2016, 8:44 am
Other topics
« Photography Setups



LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop Technique Exchange Group


You Your home page | LEGO creations | Favorite builders
Activity Activity | Comments | Creations
Explore Explore | Recent | Groups
MOCpages is an unofficial, fan-created website. LEGO® and the brick configuration are property of The LEGO Group, which does not sponsor, own, or endorse this site.
©2002-2019 Sean Kenney Design Inc | Privacy policy | Terms of use