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Behind the Camera
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 Group moderator 
This is a place where people can discuss tips on what to set up that wont show in the actual picture. For example, scene supports, lighting, setting up camera angles, etc.

My first peice of advice is to build only what the viewer is supposed to see. Don't waste pieces on unseen details. Ill admit I have done this just to open my range of photography a bit, but the main way I do this is to create either on or two sides of the set to actually be seen. Behind this is a "blob" of various colored bricks and supports.
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| January 10, 2010, 1:53 pm
Create "modular" MOCs for your story. A few tips I could give is to make each level of a building be able to open on a side, the roof, and possibly a gap in the floor. Another thing I'm practicing is building a couple of generic hallways, turns, and scenery, and by lining them up in a certain way I can get the effect of a long corridor with a turn at each end by only using two large parts instead of four. I build the larger parts with pin and axle connections to block out light and make the creation look seamless. MEP
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| January 10, 2010, 4:48 pm
 Group moderator 
-Like Nuf said, build as less as possible but also as much as needed. Many comics shows ugly set edges, parts of the table e.g. . If you'll work on the pictures anyway, shot the whole thing and cut the scene out digitally (most cameras should have far more pixels than needed, so you don't lose quality; additionally the pictures are better than putting the camera directly in front of a fig or using zoom.)

-For shots from air or of bigger scenes, use a tripod/stand if possible

-Use "micromode" (the flower symbol on your cam)for direct action.

-Bigger buildings, which aren't really used can be shown as miniscales or just as frontwalls. The rooms i mostly build seperate instead of wasting bricks for the whole thing. But if you use a house often in your series a complete build is maybe better.

-If you know, you'll use a place again, take all photos together, so you can deconstruct a set early. For my sci-fi series i always make different shots with different characters for future episodes, also if i don't know what will happen (but i can use them).

-Lightning I don't have tipps, Lightning is my weakest talent.

-Another beginner's advice: Use backgrounds. Digital work is not necessary but a white paper, or blue(for sky), something like that works too and is always better than your room, dirty wall, colourful table etc. Look at Bryan Grahams story, he used a simple but good working background.
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| January 10, 2010, 5:53 pm
 Group moderator 
Quoting Nufalak of Mythada
This is a place where people can discuss tips on what to set up that wont show in the actual picture. For example, scene supports, lighting, setting up camera angles, etc.

My first peice of advice is to build only what the viewer is supposed to see. Don't waste pieces on unseen details. Ill admit I have done this just to open my range of photography a bit, but the main way I do this is to create either on or two sides of the set to actually be seen. Behind this is a "blob" of various colored bricks and supports.

Heh, I have no Idea just how many times I've done this. Mainly for comics and Brik wars. I might post my latest brikwars battlescape soon.
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| January 10, 2010, 8:40 pm
Quoting Christian Schlichting
...-Use "micromode" (the flower symbol on your cam)for direct action.

...-Another beginner's advice: Use backgrounds. Digital work is not necessary but a white paper, or blue(for sky), something like that works too and is always better than your room, dirty wall, colourful table etc. Look at Bryan Grahams story, he used a simple but good working background.


A good thing you pointed out is to use your “micromode” on your camera. Especially on close up shots. It makes everything more clear and in focus. I use it all the time. Another thing you said that’s a good thing is using paper for a background. I print up photos of mountains, buildings and other landscapes and use those for my backgrounds. It really easy to do. I think that’s all I have to say for now. And thanks for the advice! ^-^
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| January 11, 2010, 5:02 pm
Quoting Newt Raiden
I might post my latest brikwars battlescape soon.

I was thinking about doing the same thing! Me and my friend had one just a little while ago.
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| January 12, 2010, 7:09 pm
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