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Sheepo's Mustang Titan powered!
About this creation
Introducing my new MOC.... er....actually MOD! :) Note that the original build is not my own, it belongs to Sheepo (www.sheepo.es). Most on this site are already aware of this, but felt I needed to clear this up with any newbies or infrequent Technic browsers. However the modifications to Sheepo's model are my own, and meant to make his original model much faster!

Note that there are likely to be further modifications, I literally (okay… figuratively) could do a bazillion different things to this model. The motor that you see below is actually a motor from a popular RC car (ECX Stadium truck). Placing motors from RC cars pose a variety of problems. One, the motors are too powerful for LEGO elements, and if not careful, you will rip to shred LEGO elements trying to power a model with RC.

I will begin by saying that this build was not really began with optimal functionality in mind. Admittedly, driving the thing is hard because of the two controls (RC controller and Lego IR controller for steering) and the limitations placed on the operator because you don't want rip the thing apart. So criticisms of this point will fall upon deaf ears, I am already aware of this and because of the challenge, and the opportunity to power-up such a cool model, doing the whole project was incredibly fun for me. Remember, driving something that is clunky, awkward, and hard to manage does not mean that it cannot be incredibly fun to drive (or at least build)!



Below are some pics of the model. As can be seen in the last pic….I came up with a little technic (er…technique :) ) to save some dough. Everyone complains about flex axles and their rarity, especially in certain colors. They are rare and expensive. But…. as I believe is the case will all rare and expensive pieces, there are ways around without having to shell out twenty bucks for a piece of plastic. Even though I can afford such pieces, I think I am making a fool out of myself if I pay someone else for such an item. I think there is something to be said for coming up with one’s own way of being creative to achieve a result rather than using a method everyone else is using. To me that seems very un-LEGO like. I have many, many flex cables…. Just not in red. So….I just covered them with connectors like so. Again, not perfect, but it works for me.











Electronics as well:



As I discussed above, the drivetrain had to be strengthened significantly b/c of the strong motor. Also, I geared it down because RC motors run at notoriously high RPMs which again concerned me about ripping the model apart. Gearing it down helped that out a lot. Top speed would not be a problem (or so I thought), so I had no worries about taking away RPMs. As can be seen in the photos below (using Sariel’s gear calculator) I geared down the original configurations of gears and additional 5:1 (one 12T gear driving one 20T gear; then one 8T gear driving one 24T gear). Here are the final gearing ratios (Sheepo’s original model) after the additional gearing that I added. For gearing ratios of the original model, one need to look no further than Sheepo's site.

5:1 x 1.67:1 = 8.337:1
5:1 x 1.25:1 = 6.25:1
5:1 x 1:1 = 5:1
5:1 x 1:1.33 = 3.6:1
5.1 x 1:1.67 = 3:1

Here are pics of the motor mount. Now, many may wonder of the modifications needed to make LEGO compatible with RC motors and components. To make the motor compatible with LEGO, I used this instructable:







To mount the motor, I used my own invention. The motor screws actually fit fine into liftarm holes, but were loose because the screw diameter is so much less than liftarm hole diameters. I didn't have any washers small enough to help out, so I created this method. Twistys (the name I know them by; the kind you find at the grocery store to seal up bags of fruits and veggies) were a perfect solution. They contain very thin metal wiring and a paper wrapper. By wrapping a twisty around the screw, and screwing it into the hole, the metal in the twisty compressed against itself and the paper and created a very firm, solid washer. Much stronger than even a normal washer b/c it actually molded to the interior left-over space in the liftarm hole.



And finally, here is a video of it driving! The first video is the car raised…… not actually driving. The sound is pretty cool. In the first part the gearbox is present. The gear box carries so much more friction that I originally thought. Even with the extra 5:1 gearing that I added, the car was still too heavy to move very well. Therefore, for actually driving I had to remove the gearbox. Too much friction…. The motor could not move the car well. The second video shows the car actually driving, without the gearbox. Straight driveshaft replaced the gearbox instead. Still not as fast as I had hoped, but really it did not matter. Overall, what we knew all along the model was not built for too much speed. Really the story is there is too much weight in the back with the battery pack there. The back shocks cannot handle the load and you can see the back end bobbing up and down too much. Still……faster than the original and a darn fun project to build. But really the story to the model is that even with a more powerful motor it can’t go real fast….. the back end would either need to be lighter or double the strength in its shocks.









I had to remove the brakes as well. As can be seen, although an incredible and genius build, it is not perfect. The brake pads wore too heavily against the disk brakes, causing again too much friction.





Finally, a word about scaling. Sheepo recently announced on his site that he would be building on a scale of 1:10 rather than 1:8 from here on out. Just to perhaps elaborate on the difference this will make he mentions that one of the reasons for doing so is because it will save on pieces and time. Just to give you an idea of how much time and pieces, I estimate that decreasing a models size from 1/8 to 1/10 will cut pieces in half (and therefore cost and time to build a model). If you have half the pieces to use then roughly you will use half as much time to build a model. Here is my reasoning.

Below is a pic of the Mustang beside Crowkillers Vampire GT (my modifications, but the dimensions are the same). Crowkillers GT is roughly 1/10 scale while Sheepo’s mustang is roughly 1/8 scale. The sizes of the cars are below.



Vampire width = 21 cm Mustang Width = 24 cm = 14.24% increase
Vampire length = 44 cm Mustang Length = 60 cm = 36.33 % increase

Average of the two and you get approximately 25% increase. That is similar (but not exactly the same) as the decrease one will see from 1:8 scale to 1:10 (20%). According to Paul Borako, the Vampire GT uses approximately 2000 pieces while the Mustang is over 4,000. So, as I mentioned above, roughly double the pieces. I also blew the 42009 mobile crane up approximately 25% (length only, not width, so although it really looks so much bigger, because it is no wider it really is only around 25% bigger) and I used about double the pieces as well. So, as one can see, I think that Sheepo is making a very prudent choice in scaling down his models. No pressure Sheepo….. but we expect to see roughly double the models from you in the coming years !!!!!




Comments

 I made it 
  September 19, 2016
Quoting Chris Soon Kweon Seems like an almighty Shelby GT500 to me. Such a beauty!
Thanks Chris!
 I like it 
  September 19, 2016
Seems like an almighty Shelby GT500 to me. Such a beauty!
 I like it 
  February 16, 2016
Wonderful, love the design, the original the most glaring absence was thrust to weight ratio.
 I like it 
  September 9, 2015
That's a pretty sick beast! Hey man, do you mind if you can comment on some of my MOCs in my DA2 folder? thanks!
 I like it 
  June 24, 2015
Pretty great!
 I like it 
  June 19, 2015
Dirt Every Day!! I love that show! Anyways, this is an amazing creation. Great job!
 I like it 
  June 13, 2015
This is cool, to be sure, but likely to be stricken from the Insurgency site unless you rework that story pretty quickly into something that starts with "science" and ends with "iction."
  May 29, 2015
Interesting adaptation of that RC motor, Nerds. Can't wait to see what you do with it in the rotor dept. Curious, what's the motor's no-load speed, and how does that compare with its shaft speed at the Mustang's direct-drive top speed?
 I made it 
  May 27, 2015
Quoting jds 7777 Wow! Awesome! My biggest gripe about Sheepo's Mustang (besides the fact that it looks about 10 million times cooler than anything I could create) was its low speed. I love the black highlighting on yours! I was wondering if the battery box is Lego or modified as well. As for the tranny, you could try Sariel's new 4-speed syncro. (Version 1.1) It boasts the lowest friction in a Lego 4-speed and is very small. The sycro works great. I've tried it myself, and it really could work well in your Mustang. One last thing, any plans to use this motor in a smaller, high-performance creation?
I might, I truly might. My next project, although I won't give away any details, involves rotors. This is where Lego motors really fail... for although they have decent torque (relatively) they are pretty slow in the RPM department. I don't have any of the oldies (that were really fast but poor torque) but this motor would work great in that application. Rotors on an aircraft don't need tons of torque but they need tons of speed, so to be as realistic as possible I am considering using a RC motor like in this build.
 I like it 
  May 26, 2015
Wow! Awesome! My biggest gripe about Sheepo's Mustang (besides the fact that it looks about 10 million times cooler than anything I could create) was its low speed. I love the black highlighting on yours! I was wondering if the battery box is Lego or modified as well. As for the tranny, you could try Sariel's new 4-speed syncro. (Version 1.1) It boasts the lowest friction in a Lego 4-speed and is very small. The sycro works great. I've tried it myself, and it really could work well in your Mustang. One last thing, any plans to use this motor in a smaller, high-performance creation?
 I like it 
  May 26, 2015
This is truly great. I love how you go about building models in unconventional ways (like your Unimog!)
 I made it 
  May 25, 2015
Quoting Gabor Pauler It is a good idea of covering flex rods with tubes. It even works pretty well in LDD. If I were you I would try covering series of curved rods with series of cross-placed technic beams, this way, gently curved surfaces can be formed in large scale.
Good feedback, but that adds to the weight of the model big time. My first priority was to take a well-known MOC and modify it to go faster. Adding weight would not help that. But.... your right, adding the liftarms cross-placed really adds to the looks of a model
 I like it 
  May 25, 2015
amazing!:D
 I like it 
  May 25, 2015
It is a good idea of covering flex rods with tubes. It even works pretty well in LDD. If I were you I would try covering series of curved rods with series of cross-placed technic beams, this way, gently curved surfaces can be formed in large scale.
 I like it 
  May 25, 2015
I think the way you've got around the flex axle situation makes it look even better, and speed is always good! I totally agree about there being little need to pay absurd prices for rare parts.
 I like it 
  May 24, 2015
Insane!
 I like it 
  May 24, 2015
just fantastic
 I like it 
  May 24, 2015
Nice job!
 
By Nirds forprez
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