MOCpages : Share your LEGO® creations
LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop “Flying Suitcase” Foldable Autogiro for SuperagentsBionicle
Welcome to the world's greatest LEGO fan community!
Explore cool creations, share your own, and have lots of fun together.  ~  It's all free!
“Flying Suitcase” Foldable Autogiro for Superagents
Rate it  12345       Add a comment Add a comment   Zoom in  Zoom in
With semi-rigid, 2-blade, foldable, Bell-type rotor and collective/cyclic controls, foldable rotor mast, 2-blade propeller driven by 1-cylinder, 2-stroke, liquid cooled engine, foldable double rudder yaw control, spring driven shooting submachinegun, 1 Bionicle/Technic pilot, in scale 1:10
About this creation
1 Introduction and inspiration

Our “Flying Suitcase” Foldable Autogiro (rotorcraft with unpowered, auto-rotating rotor to develop lift, and engine-powered pusher propeller) MOC is a must buy item on the shopping list of Hollywood superagents.
Our goal was to design the most compactly foldable, self-contained (no external flexible parts, like paraglider, etc.) flying machine, which can carry one lightly armed person. Its primary tasks are dropping agents behind enemy lines, rescue VIPs from areas overrun by enemy, compact shipboard life rescue device, etc.:


Figure 1: Functional overview of Autogiro
See in high resolution
See model in LDD

The inspiration partly came from Wallis Wa-116 Autogiro from 1962 featured in the James Bond-movie “You live only twice”:


Figure 2: Wallis Wa-116 Autogiro

More realistic inspiration for supercompact folding of a single seat rotorcraft came from Kamov Ka-56 ultralight coaxial helicopter designed for SPECNAS demolition commandos of Russian Navy in 1971.


Figure 3: Kamov Ka-56

2 Action screenshots of Autogiro

*For considerable part of rendering and artwork, very special thanks to C BigBoy99899


Figure 4: Autogiro front view
See in high resolution
See model in LDD


Figure 5: Autogiro right view
See in high resolution
See model in LDD


Figure 6: Autogiro top view
See in high resolution
See model in LDD


Figure 7: Autogiro bottom view
See in high resolution
See model in LDD


Figure 8: The correct unfolding sequence of Autogiro?!?!
See in high resolution
See model in LDD

Regarding Figure 8, one can remember that James – despite showing considerable gift in womanizing - is a technical analphabet (it is always Q, who provides him with high tech gizmos!). Therefore he forces two pretty female Russian “sleeping agents” by gun pointing to assemble Autogiro, which was smuggled in Dr. Evil’s castle as a large suitcase full of woman’s garment:


Figure 9: Autogiro folded
See in high resolution
See model in LDD

3 Technical details of Autogiro

*This part is technical and for helicopter/ autogyro builders with at least some experience. If you do not understand how do helicopter/ autogyro controls work, you can find an excellent summary at: www.aviastar.org

**In the forthcoming technical description, functional parts of Autogiro are referenced by numbers which can be found on technical drawings attached

***Parts of Autogiro are color-coded by their function:
- Yellow: Manual handles of working functions
- Gray/Black: Static parts
- White: Dynamic parts
- Blue: Harness of pilot
- Red: Fuel tank
- Orange: Lubricant oil
- Dark green: Battery
- Light blue: Air filter


3.1 Dynamic systems of Autogiro

3.1.1 Main rotor


Figure 10: Autogiro main rotor
See in high resolution
See in LDD

Traditionally, autogiros have simple semi-rigid type rotor with cyclic blade pitch control, and no collective control at all. But as our Autogiro is a very compact vehicle, which should be quickly folded into dimensions of a large suitcase, it cannot have long tail and sizeable rudder surfaces. So, most of the stabilization control should be made by the rotor. Therefore we used semi-rigid Bell-type rotor with collective/cyclic input mixing. Of course, this is much more expensive and requires more maintenance, but our Autogiro is for military application. Creating rotor controls - because of the very limited space - we could not use the TLG part ‘Swashplate’ part with its bearing, gimbal and ball joints. Instead of it, rotor blades are gently forced to keep zero degree pitch by (R2) torsion springs made from ‘Rubber damper 2×1×1’. (R8) swashplate here is just a plain plate with a hole in the middle made from ‘Flat tile 2×2 rounded with hole 4.85’, letting through (R11) main rotor mast. Swashplate and can be tilted/lifted around main rotor mast on (R10) ring by its +55/-55 degrees-positioned (R9) cyclic ball joints. In the reality, attitude of swashplate is normally controlled by 4 ball joints, so the current solution is mechanically less effective, but can save lot of sorely needed space, while retains basic functionality. Swashplate pushes (R6) blade pitch pushrods of lower rotor by their lower tip (which slide on swashplate), increasing pitch of the blades by (R5) blade pitch arms against the force of (R2) torsion springs. (R6) Blade pitch rods are aligned by (R7) disc. This is how we eliminated the need for large diameter bearing in swashplate. Blades can be folded 90 degrees downward around (R3) blade folding pivot. In opened position, they are locked by (R4) blade locking pins and (R2) rubber dampers.

3.1.2 Drivetrain


Figure 11: Autogiro drivetrain
See in high resolution
See model in LDD

Autogiros usually drive their rotor only at start to spin it up, and there is no need to transmit high torque. Therefore engine is usually connected with main rotor gearing through a light flexible driveshaft, which can be de-clutched from engine by releasing the tension on a V-belt. We had clearly no space for this solution. Therefore we opted for (D1) 1 cylinder engine with vertical crankshaft, where the cylinder is placed under the lower tip of main rotor mast. The engine drives (D3) 9-stud diameter pusher propeller via (D2) pair of Z12 half beveled gears at gearing ratio 1:1. Rotor is driven by (D4) Z20 half beveled gear, which can slide on its axis, and connected to engine with the help of (D5) clutch pullrod + lever + catch, at gearing ratio 3:5. Drive is transmitted to main rotor mast via (D6) pair of Z12 half beveled gears.

3.1.3 Collective blade pitch control


Figure 12: Autogiro collective blade pitch control
See in high resolution
See model in LDD

Collective blade pitch is influenced by (C1) collective sliding block, pressing (R8) swashplate centrally upward via (R10) pivot ring, against the force of (R2) torsion springs. It is lifted by (C3) collective lever, which has (C2) pivot point and (C4) foldable extension. Autogiros usually do not have collective pitch control, as ideal collective pitch for autorotation is fixed around 8 degrees. But, rotor blades can be folded neatly and compactly only if they are shifted back to zero degrees pitch. Moreover, we wanted to keep the possibility to create foldable personal helicopter from this MOC later.

3.1.4 Cyclic blade pitch control


Figure 13: Autogiro cyclic blade pitch control
See in high resolution
See model in LDD

Creating cyclic control, we had to develop a cyclic/collective input mixing linkage, which connects (R9) cyclic ball joints via (C1) collective sliding block with (C11) yoke. In the meantime, it should be foldable, allowing main rotor mast forward tilted 90 degrees around (C7) axis, without disconnecting controls. This is achieved by rear hinges of (C8) horizontal cyclic trackrods, which are exactly in line with (C7) main rotor mast pivot axis at 0 degree pitch/roll/collective blade angle setting.

3.1.5 Yaw control and landing gear


Figure 14: Autogiro yaw control and landing gear
See in high resolution
See model in LDD

Yaw control is done with (C15) forward foldable double rudder surfaces connected with (C12) yaw control pedal via (C13) yaw control rods. They have (C14) pivot points to handle folding when yaw control is set exactly to zero degrees.
Autogiro has fixed tricycle landing gear with castoring double nose wheels. They can serve both in folded and open position.

3.2 Armament and harness of Autogiro


Figure 15: Armament and harness of Autogiro
See in high resolution
See model in LDD

Designing our Autogiro, we recognized that pilot’s seat seriously hinders compact folding. This is not true in the reality, where seat can be very compact, but safe seating Bionicle torso of pilot requires quite a sizeable seat and seat belts compared to the size of the craft. Therefore, we opted for (H1) removable seat and harness, which stays on pilot. Seat is fixed by a locking pin and fixing lips of undercarriage.
Because of space constraints of folding, 2-axis weapon mount is foldable and fixed to yaw control pedal.

3.2.1 Spring driven shooting SM-8 submachine gun


Figure 16: Firing cycle of SM-8 submachine gun
See in high resolution
See model in LDD

Against James Bond movies, an autogiro is too light and small for having any serious armament, moreover it is not very steady firing platform: for the correct autorotation, it is critical to keep right angle of incidence of rotor. Recoil of any bigger weapon seriously hinders that. Therefore, our Autogiro just carries SM-8 spring driven shooting compact personal defense submachine gun of pilot. SM-8 has (W5) propellant spring disassembled from TLG part ‘Shock absorber extra hard’, (W4) rotating type of bolt made from ‘Screwdriver’, (W3) 8-round, manual advanced drum magazine made from ‘Z8 gear’ and ‘Tire 16mm’ around that to hold projectiles. 1.5×7.5mm projectiles are not TLG parts, as TLG does not produce such a small parts because of children safety reasons, moreover ABS is not enough heavy to form reasonable projectile in such a small size. Projectiles are made from 1.5mm copper electric wire can be bought in any hardware store. (W1) 1.6×24mm barrel of the weapon can be tilted aside around axis of (W2) optical sight to facilitate replacement of (W3) drum magazine with a loaded one. (H1) pilot’s harness stores 1 spare drum magazine.

4 Dimensions of Autogiro

- Main rotor diameter: 40.00 studs / 320.00 mm / 12.60 in, Real size: 3.20 m / 10 ft 5.91 in
- Main rotor disc area: 1256.64 sqstuds / 804.25 sqcm / 124.66 sqinch, Real size: 8.04 sqm / 86.46 sqfeet
- Propeller diameter: 9.00 studs / 72.00 mm / 2.83 in, Real size: 0.72 m / 2 ft 4.33 in
- Rudder area: 54.00 sqstuds / 34.56 sqcm / 5.36 sqinch, Real size: 0.35 sqm / 3.72 sqfeet
- Total lenght: 30.00 studs / 240.00 mm / 9.45 in, Real size: 2.40 m / 7 ft 10.43 in
- Total width: 8.00 studs / 64.00 mm / 2.52 in, Real size: 0.64 m / 2 ft 1.18 in
- Total height: 20.00 studs / 160.00 mm / 6.30 in, Real size: 1.60 m / 5 ft 2.95 in
- Clearance under main rotor: 18.00 studs / 144.00 mm / 5.67 in, Real size: 1.44 m / 4 ft 8.66 in
- Folded lenght: 20.50 studs / 164.00 mm / 6.46 in, Real size: 1.64 m / 5 ft 4.53 in
- Folded width: 8.00 studs / 64.00 mm / 2.52 in, Real size: 0.64 m / 2 ft 1.18 in
- Folded height: 12.00 studs / 96.00 mm / 3.78 in, Real size: 0.96 m / 3 ft 1.77 in

5 Unsolved issues

- Tail folding unit can be assembled only by forced clicking-in Technic bricks. Once assembled, it does not impose any extra load on bricks, but putting it together risks breaking the bricks.


Building instructions
Download building instructions (LEGO Digital Designer)

Comments

 I made it 
  September 10, 2017
Quoting Kurt's MOCs Insanely cool! I am sorry that I'm only finding this now. Great detail and design work.
Thanks. Since that I have much more advance foldable autogiro model with electric drive as part of one of my latest MOC Flying Personnel Carrier.
 I like it 
  September 10, 2017
Insanely cool! I am sorry that I'm only finding this now. Great detail and design work.
 I made it 
  November 12, 2015
Quoting Werewolff . Great work! Very complex and functional model, I like it!
Thanks.
 I like it 
  November 12, 2015
Great work! Very complex and functional model, I like it!
 I made it 
  November 8, 2015
Quoting Jeremy McCreary Gabor, since you were willing to go non-LEGO with the machine gun ammo, may I suggest shrink-wrap tubing as a solution to the miniskirt problem? It comes in many stylish colors and can be as tight as desired within the bounds of decency or beyond. It's even likely to be on the same aisle as the copper wire.
Haha, good idea. I would rather think about using several 'Mantle for minifig' TLG parts, the problem is that it can be fixed on minifig's neck in LDD.
 I like it 
  November 8, 2015
Gabor, since you were willing to go non-LEGO with the machine gun ammo, may I suggest shrink-wrap tubing as a solution to the miniskirt problem? It comes in many stylish colors and can be as tight as desired within the bounds of decency or beyond. It's even likely to be on the same aisle as the copper wire.
 I made it 
  November 8, 2015
Quoting Jeremy McCreary Forgot to say that the foldability puts the "3Dness" of the design through the roof!
Through the roof is true only if James Bond forgets to open the sliding top of the secret underground base before starting...
 I made it 
  November 8, 2015
Quoting Jeremy McCreary Gabor, your knowledge of helicopter technology continues to amaze, and your LEGO implemenations of it are truly dazzling. Q1: Do you really have to be a superagent to have one of these things? Looks like the perfect exit strategy for boring meetings and family gatherings. Q2: Wouldn't you be able to up the armamentation by limiting pilots to petite (but deadly) female superagents? Just askin'. If you don't mind, I have some additional offline questions for you as well: mocpages@cliffshade.com.
Thanks. My answers: Q1: Can you imagine any of your neighbors have the courage to fly with this except being skunk drunk? Q2: You touched sensitive topic: the problem is with mini-skirts: my current solution is so uncompact that it would not even fit into a tank. I tried my best to create more compact skirt in scale 1:10 without any result. Constructive critics welcome. Another problem is with womens head (just like in the reality...) I can solve it only with ponytail currently, therefore it will not fit in most pilots seats.
 I like it 
  November 7, 2015
Forgot to say that the foldability puts the "3Dness" of the design through the roof!
  November 7, 2015
Gabor, your knowledge of helicopter technology continues to amaze, and your LEGO implemenations of it are truly dazzling. Q1: Do you really have to be a superagent to have one of these things? Looks like the perfect exit strategy for boring meetings and family gatherings. Q2: Wouldn't you be able to up the armamentation by limiting pilots to petite (but deadly) female superagents? Just askin'. If you don't mind, I have some additional offline questions for you as well: mocpages@cliffshade.com.
 I made it 
  November 5, 2015
Quoting c bigboy99899 Great Idea and Build!
Thanks.
 I like it 
  November 5, 2015
Great Idea and Build!
 I made it 
  November 3, 2015
Quoting Nerds forprez This is really wonderful Gabor. Terrific stuff. I was going to make some snide remark about how I wouldn't check it at the airport, but then I realized.... No need to check it, or even book a flight!
Thanks. After sleeping overnight at the lounge at JFK airport because of pilot timeout at Delta (personal experience), believe me, you also would be in the mental condition to fly with this from New York to Buffalo!
 I like it 
  November 2, 2015
This is really wonderful Gabor. Terrific stuff. I was going to make some snide remark about how I wouldn't check it at the airport, but then I realized.... No need to check it, or even book a flight!
 I made it 
  November 2, 2015
Quoting Henrik Jensen Another amazing creation! It`s incredible that you managed to make it foldable, and at least theoretically, make it Work.
Thanks. Another compact design coming soon: a flat type coaxial rotor. It will move the "click or break"-problem further...
 I like it 
  November 2, 2015
Another amazing creation! It`s incredible that you managed to make it foldable, and at least theoretically, make it Work.
Gabor Pauler
 I like it 
Matt Bace
  October 31, 2015
Another amazing work of engineering! It's hard to believe that you managed to design a working cyclic/collective control that will fit into such a tiny package.
 I made it 
  October 31, 2015
Quoting Matt Bace Another amazing work of engineering! It's hard to believe that you managed to design a working cyclic/collective control that will fit into such a tiny package.
Well, it would work in a very nasty way, but at least it would show some signs of functionality. Size of technic bricks are really prohibitive in such a small size. I don't think I will be able to design smaller functional rotor than this. I have a miniaturization idea about coaxial rotors also - you can see that within 7-10 days...
 I made it 
  October 31, 2015
Quoting Rabbitdesign MB Again great design. Besides live to read your stories about your creations. I like the shaer passion you show. Keep going!
Thanks.
 I made it 
  October 31, 2015
Quoting Oliver Becker Say: WOW! On the one hand there's so much of an expert/technician in this construction and on the other hand there's also so much sparcle in the overall appearance of you MOC, Gabor! Great stuff! :)
Thanks.
 I like it 
  October 31, 2015
Again great design. Besides live to read your stories about your creations. I like the shaer passion you show. Keep going!
 I like it 
  October 31, 2015
Say: WOW! On the one hand there's so much of an expert/technician in this construction and on the other hand there's also so much sparcle in the overall appearance of you MOC, Gabor! Great stuff! :)
 
By Gabor Pauler
Add to my favorite builders

15
people like this. See who.

3,301 visitors
22 comments
Added October 31, 2015
Ultralight Coaxial Attacker Helicopter  You are at the end of this folder.
More from Gabor
More across MOCpages
 


LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop “Flying Suitcase” Foldable Autogiro for SuperagentsBionicle


You Your home page | LEGO creations | Favorite builders
Activity Activity | Comments | Creations
Explore Explore | Recent | Groups
MOCpages is an unofficial, fan-created website. LEGO® and the brick configuration are property of The LEGO Group, which does not sponsor, own, or endorse this site.
©2002-2018 Sean Kenney Design Inc | Privacy policy | Terms of use