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Centrifugal blacklight top
A spinning top with parts aglow under blacklight can produce some pretty trippy visual effects. When some of the glowing parts also respond to centrifugal force, the effects become speed-dependent.
About this creation
Please feel free to look over the images and skip the verbiage.

This is the 2nd in a series of "blacklight tops" -- i.e., LEGOŽ spinning tops designed specifically for their appearance while spinning under a blacklight.

The added twist this time: "Emitters" (fluorescent parts) mounted on peripheral "swingarms" free to express the speed-dependent balance between gravity and centrifugal force, like so...



NB: Best to watch the video on a computer, as the captions relating effects to their swingarm emitter configurations don't show up on mobile devices.

Same top in visible light...





The non-fluorescent predecessor of this top comes in at 8:31 in the centrifugal top collection below...



If you enjoyed this LEGOŽ light show, you might also like my other blacklight tops and blacklight ravographs.

More on fluorescence and phosphorescence in the LEGOŽ realm here.

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Optional: How it works

Warning! Always wear eye protection when working or playing with high-speed LEGOŽ rotating machinery and keep valuables and bystanders (including pets) a safe distance away -- especially when testing new designs.

The brightly fluorescent emitters on this top sweep out speed-dependent "rings" of light under blacklight (UVA) illumination. The effect relies on (i) flicker fusion, (ii) additive color mixing, (iii) centrifugal force, which grows with the square of speed, and of course (iv) the fluorescence of certain LEGOŽ parts.

The inner emitters fixed to the top's black studless chassis glow orange and green light under UVA. The outer "mobile" emitters, which are free to swing outward under centrifugal force, glow green and blue.



The orange and green emissions mix additively to yellow whenever they occupy the same line of sight within the same flicker fusion threshold interval. The blue and green emissions mix additively to pale cyan.

The color, geometry, and inner and outer radius of the mobile outer ring depend on (i) the speed of the top, (ii) viewing angle, and most of all (iii) the orientation of each mobile emitter relative to its swingarm. Relative to a =horizontal= swingarm, an attached mobile emitter can point "in" (toward the spin axis), "out", "up", or "down". The video captions also use this notation.

The "blue out, green in" configuration shown in the last photo produces a circular rainbow with thin mixing bands of yellow and cyan and no gap between inner and outer rings. The video opens with this configuration.



Blue up, green in:





Blue out, green up:





Blue down, green up:





Blue out, green out, with mobile emitters in full overlap:





The final "blue down, green in" configuration produces a Frisbee-like object better seen in the video at 12:32.





The LEGO parts serving as emitters were chosen primarily for emitted color, size, shape, emitting surface area. Fluorescent Bioncle teeth (x346) make excellent mobile emitters for several reasons: (i) Brighter than usual emissions from such a small package. (ii) Axle holes provide secure mounting in any of 4 different orienations. (iii) Streamlined shape reduces the aerodynamic penalty paid when exposing any top part to a resisting relative wind.

Unbalance and resonant flexure of the rotor cause most of the persistent wobbling. The only significant sources of unbalance in this top are (i) unseated parts, and (ii) imperfect centering of the swingarm axle ring on the spin axis.

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Comments

 I made it 
  December 3, 2016
Quoting cyberfrank 2010 very imaginative and beautiful!
Thank you!
 I like it 
  December 3, 2016
very imaginative and beautiful!
 I made it 
  December 2, 2016
Quoting Oliver Becker Can't top Nick's comment, so I totally agree, Jeremy! Another spectacular entertainment from you to make people happy here! :)
Too kind, Oliver!
 I like it 
  December 2, 2016
Can't top Nick's comment, so I totally agree, Jeremy! Another spectacular entertainment from you to make people happy here! :)
 I made it 
  November 30, 2016
Quoting Johan van der Pluijm Looks cool! What about a car with these effects? Dont ask me how to make a video of it :D
Thanks, Johan! Driving a remote control car with fluorescent parts around in the dark under a blacklight sounds like fun to me. I think I'll try it!
 I like it 
  November 29, 2016
Looks cool! What about a car with these effects? Dont ask me how to make a video of it :D
 I made it 
  November 29, 2016
Quoting D H This is an especially nice effect this time!
Much appreciated, DH!
 I like it 
  November 29, 2016
This is an especially nice effect this time!
 I made it 
  November 29, 2016
Quoting Oran Cruzen DeLIGHTful!
Thanks, Oran!
 I like it 
  November 29, 2016
DeLIGHTful!
 I made it 
  November 29, 2016
Quoting Nils O. Very cool, the blacklight reflection is a great additional feature. The balance between gravity and centrifugal force is equally cool. Great job! :-))
Very kind, Nils! I'm still amassing fluorescent parts, especially trans-medium blue, so there'll be more blacklight tops to come.
 I made it 
  November 29, 2016
Quoting Deus "Big D." Otiosus Pretty trippy.
Thanks, Big D! With LEGO, who needs drugs?
 I made it 
  November 29, 2016
Quoting MCLegoboy ! That's a really innovative way to show how light works. The Blue and Green make a Cyan color, just how light would. And you get varying shades based on how much light is being mixed from each side. Cool top.
Thanks! Yes, light mixing rules apply with tops. Last year, I posted a MOCpage dedicated to color-mixing tops, but none were fluorescent.
 I like it 
  November 29, 2016
Very cool, the blacklight reflection is a great additional feature. The balance between gravity and centrifugal force is equally cool. Great job! :-))
 I like it 
  November 29, 2016
Pretty trippy.
 I like it 
  November 29, 2016
That's a really innovative way to show how light works. The Blue and Green make a Cyan color, just how light would. And you get varying shades based on how much light is being mixed from each side. Cool top.
 I made it 
  November 29, 2016
Quoting Nick Barrett Fantastic! MOCpages is back, and Jeremy's doing cool stuff with spinning tops. All is right with the world.
Very kind, Nick!
 I made it 
  November 29, 2016
Quoting Seaman SPb Excellent!
Thanks, Seaman!
 I like it 
  November 29, 2016
Fantastic! MOCpages is back, and Jeremy's doing cool stuff with spinning tops. All is right with the world.
 I like it 
  November 28, 2016
Excellent!
 I made it 
  November 28, 2016
Thank you!
 I like it 
  November 28, 2016
Beautiful! 5/5
 
By Jeremy McCreary
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LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop Centrifugal blacklight topTechnic


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