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ITSA Finger Top Kit
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The lucky winner of this raffle donation will know a lot about tops in general but very little about LEGO® tops. This MOCpage is all about getting the most out of the prize -- especially WRT experimentation.
About this creation
Please feel free to look over the images and skip the verbiage.

I'm donating this LEGO® finger top kit to the International Top Spinner's Association as a raffle prize. This MOCpage is the winner's user's manual. The glossary defines words and phrases with potentially unfamiliar specific meanings. Defined terms appear in italics on first use.



The raffle winner will be familiar with finger tops but will likely have spent much more time with string-launched throwing tops -- the kind most people think of when they hear "spinning top". In fact, the winner will probably be an expert throwing top player -- perhaps even a former world champion. He or she might also be a serious top collector, a top maker, or any combination of these things.

But one thing's certain: The winner will have had little or no hands-on experience with LEGO® finger tops -- hence this page and video.



NB: The behaviors seen in the video aren't due to the vagaries of my twirling technique. They're characteristic of the tops themselves, and that's in large part what this kit is all about. It's also about appearance at speed as much as at rest.

The tops will be fun to twirl right out of the box (after the parts have been reseated), but they'll also be easy to modify for experimentation purposes, with or without these included extra parts.



At that point, the winner will be playing with top physics through LEGO® just like I like to do. I don't cover potential uses for the parts here, but the winner is encouraged to contact me for tips via the iTopSpin forum.

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The tops

The kit includes 13 tops of 11 different types -- some already in my LEGO® spinning top folder or YouTube channel, some new. Several of them will spin over 60 sec with a good clean twirl.

NB: Unseated parts can cause wobble, even if not ostensibly loose. For best results, press all parts firmly back into place before spinning any LEGO® top -- especially after unpacking or a fall off the table.



Type 1. Plate-based color-mixing top: Tops based on 10x10 octagonal plates are very versatile. Here, I'm using one as a platform for experiments in additive color mixing.

James Clerk Maxwell, by all accounts the 19th century's greatest physicist, used experimental tops of his own design to found the modern theory of human color vision ca. 1855.

Appearance at rest...




Appearance at low speed...



In person at even higher speeds, the complementary colors fuse to form a pure white band between inner and outer off-grays. None of these dynamic colors are present at rest.

This rotor design consistently delivers long, smooth spins -- in large part due to a combination of high specific AMI, low CM height, low specific TMI, and favorable aerodynamics. Here it is again in a set of clutch tops with detaching stems...



More on LEGO® color-mixing tops here and here.



∨ Type 2. Motorcycle wheel top: LEGO® wheels make great top rotors for several reasons: (i) They have convenient center holes. (ii) They're stiff enough to withstand the centrifugal stresses involved without flexing or flying apart. (iii) They tend to have high specific AMIs. Just add a stem and a suitable tip and twirl!




Few wheels have higher specific AMIs than this large dark gray motorcycle wheel. The peripheral red dots are partly for decoration and partly to make the top's specific AMI even higher. The dots are easily removed and reinstalled in any combination for experimentation with AMI and unbalance.

Three even easier experiments I recommend:
  • Slide the wheel up and down the central axle and watch how behavior changes. (Upward increases CM height, TMI, and TMI/AMI ratio without affecting AMI. Downward does the opposite.)
  • Then swap the red antenna tip shown for the red ball tip in the extra parts bag and repeat the experiment.
  • Then remove the ball tip and spin the top on the resulting axle tip at various rotor heights.
In the configuration shown, this top's preferred behavior is steady precession, but twirling a sleeper isn't too hard. Either way, the antenna tip tends to minimize travel.



∨ Type 3. Rover wheel top: Here's another wheel top to try with different rotor heights and tips. Its behavior is rather different from that of the motorcycle wheel top.




In the configuration shown, the preferred behavior is steady precession with considerable travel in arcs, but eventually, it rights itself and sleeps. The ball tip is responsible for the travel and self-righting.



Types 4 and 5. Small wheel tops: Finger top behavior is mostly governed by mass distribution, aerodynamics, tip properties, ground properties, release speed, release tilt, and other details of the spin-up process. Absolute size and mass have much less to do with it, and that scalability allows you to turn favorably shaped small wheels into high-performance tops like these.

The smaller black "Znap wheel" top will come as shown with a black antenna tip in a yellow mount and a yellow stem meant for overhand twirls. The larger example will come with no stem and a long axle tip meant for underhand twirls. These configurations are easily reversed.




Both rotors have high specific AMIs, and the black Znap rotor has clean aerodynamics.

This video features underhand Znap wheel tops with axle tips. With a good hard underhand snap, these support tricks just not possible with other tops in the kit.



More on small Znap wheel tops here and here.



∨ Type 6. Gyrophonic tops: These odd little tops are a lot of fun to watch, listen to, and tinker with. The disks making up rotors are easily raised, lowered, separated, or even removed, and their behaviors are very sensitive to such changes.



The kit comes with 2 gyrophonic tops identical except for color. They'll arrive as shown with the lime top's rotor improbably high and the yellow's as low as it will go. Try these configurations before tinkering with them, but by all means tinker away. Note the 3 extra disks in the parts provided.



AMI depends only on the thick and thin disk counts. Disk locations along the axle have no effect on AMI but are easily manipulated to control behavior through CM height and TMI.

Isolating the effect of TMI on behavior:
  • Starting with the yellow top configuration in the last photo, keep the disks together and slide them along the axle until the black disk is centered on the top's CM.
  • Spin the top and note its behavior.
  • Then keep the black disk where it is and separate the yellow disks from it by equal distances. This maneuver increases TMI by an amount that grows with disk separation without affecting CM height and AMI.
  • How does behavior change?


Why "gyrophonic"? As you can see in the videos, these tops are prone to abrupt transitions in behavior. Between the transitions are longer-lasting modes of behavior that evolve much more slowly. The photos show only 4 of many possible rotor configurations, each with a characteristic sequence of modes drawn from the same pool of 6-8 common modes.

And as you can hear, each common mode makes its own characteristic sound as the tip interacts with the chosen ground. That's the "-phonic" part. As for the "gyro-" part, each mode is a distinct combination of spin and either (i) gravity-driven gyroscopic precession about the vertical axis through the CM or (ii) horizontal rotation on the ground about that same axis after landing. Gyroscopic nutation occasionally adds a jerking motion to the precession.

So, keep a close eye and ear on these tops as they spin down. After a while, you'll be able to recognize what they're doing with your eyes closed! And with control over rotor configuration and ground, you can then design for the sound.



Ball tips generate the most entertaining gyrophonic modes and sounds by far. I really like the whirring sounds they make on the drum-like floor of this textured plastic arena.

More info about gyrophonic tops in the video description.



∨ Type 7. Cockpit top: Tops based on the big black 8-sided "cockpit" here perform well and are fun to decorate, though usually at the expense of spin time via increased aerodynamic drag.




The big blue parts near the dark gray antenna tip are more than just decorations, though. They also reduce critical speed by increasing specific AMI and lowering CM height and specific TMI. And that makes any cockpit top much easier to start by hand.

More on cockpit tops here and in the videos below...







∨ Type 8. Large dish top: Rotors formed by opposing "dishes" are exceptionally sleek by LEGO® standards. This top's specific AMI isn't the highest here, but its CM is pretty low, and you can't get better aerodynamics in a LEGO® top. CM height and aerodynamics count for a lot in the spin time department.




Dish tops are also happy to sleep quietly.



More on dish tops.



∨ Type 9. Battle tops: I designed these wheel tops specifically for battle games. The cleats on the rotors make for exciting collisions, the ball tips aid in targeting by providing controllable travel across the arena, and the easily changed decorations identify competitors.



In person, the orange and lime dots on the right fuse to a warm yellow at speed.



The tops will arrive with tips and rotor heights optimized for fast-paced action in battle, but by all means experiment.

This older video shows many such battle tops going at it on a plastic arena trained to sag in the center, as in the centuries-old Japanese game of bei. This increases collision frequency by drawing competitors together, but flat arenas like the microwave platter in the kit video work pretty well, too.



More on these battle tops.



∨ Type 10. Large round tile top: The kit's longest and smoothest spins (70 sec in kit video) belong to this colorful low-drag top with a modified antenna tip.




The through-going central axles in the tops shown so far simplified their construction, but this 3-layer rotor has no center hole. Attaching a stem was easy enough, but coming up with a tip stiff enough to deliver smooth spins was a challenge.



∨ Type 11. Elliptical top: Top rotors don't have to be round or polygonal in plan view to perform well.




Articles and textbook sections on tops often state (without proof or qualification) that for a top to spin stably on its tip, the rotor must have at least 3-fold rotational symmetry about the spin axis as seen from above with the stem vertical. But there must be more to the story, because this elliptical rotor does quite well with only 2-fold symmetry. It just needs a little more speed.

In person, this top and several others here produce striking and constantly evolving visual effects as they spin down under pulsed light sources. This is best seen with a variable-speed strobe, but overhead LED lights on wall dimmers also work. The pulsations of the latter are normally too fast to be seen by design, but spinning tops with favorable resting geometric patterns can reveal their presence.

If your house has both LED and incandescent overhead lights, try spinning all the tops under both sources and see what happens.

Enjoy your prize!

≪ Back to top




Optional: LEGO® top glossary

This seemed like a good place for a comprehensive glossary oriented toward LEGO® tops. Some of the terms here are my own, and some are specific to the genre. Most, however, apply to any top with at least 3-fold rotational symmetry, regardless of exact shape. Most of the links are to explanatory Wikipedia pages.

AMI — Short for axial moment of inertia, with "axial" referring to the symmetry axis (almost always the intended spin axis). AMI measures the top's resistance to angular acceleration about the symmetry axis. It's proportional to total mass, the square of maximum rotor radius, and a purely geometric factor depending only on the location of top mass relative to the symmetry axis as a fraction of maximum radius. Importantly, AMI is independent of CM height. High AMI makes a top hard to spin up and equally hard to decelerate -- the latter, for example, by aerodynamic drag or tip friction.

Antenna tip — A fine, high-performance tip (radius of curvature 1.5 mm) cut from the end of a round-tipped LEGO® antenna. To adapt the cut antenna end (black below) to a central axle, you need a suitable tip holder with an axle hole -- e.g., a 2x2 dome (red below) or 1x1 cone (yellow below). Antenna tips tend to promote long spins dominated by sleeping or steady precession with little or no travel.




Axial — Refers here to the top's rotational symmetry axis, which is almost always the top's intended spin axis. The black through-going central axles in these gyrophonic tops are axial in orientation.



Axle tip — The uncovered end of a splined 4.8 mm LEGO® cross-axle (black below; radius of curvature not applicable). Axle tips tend to make for lively tops with quirky travel. The spin-time penalty is surprisingly small, and the ride is smoother than than you might expect considering the splines.



Ball tip — A broad, all-purpose tip (radius of curvature 5 mm) made from a LEGO® Technic ball joint, here in red. At high angular speeds, ball tips encourage smooth, steady precession with pronounced travel. At low speeds, however, the tiny dimple (mold scar) opposite the axle hole can trigger wobble. Greater contact-patch friction exacts a small spin-time penalty relative to the high-performance antenna tip. Unlike the latter, however, the ball tip has its own built-in axle adapter and involves no modification of LEGO® parts.



Behavior — The sequence of top motions playing out after release. Behavior is to a top as the choreography as danced is to a ballerina. The basic building blocks are spin decay, precession, self-righting, nutation, whirl, and travel. Finger top behavior is mostly governed by mass distribution, aerodynamics, tip properties, ground properties, and details of the spin-up process -- especially the release. The top's absolute size and total mass have much less to do with it.

Bei — The centuries-old Japanese battle top game described here.

CM — Short for center of mass. In a statically balanced top, the CM lies on the geometric symmetry axis by definition -- usually somewhere within the rotor. LEGO® precision molding guarantees static balance in any top with fully seated parts arranged in at least 2-fold rotational symmetry, as in the kit's elliptical top.

CM height — Tip-CM distance, equal to the height of the CM above the ground when the top is vertical. CM height influences top behavior and spin time more than any other parameter. In most LEGO® tops, the CM is on the central axle somewhere within the rotor. But in a gyrophonic top with arbitrary separations between rotor disks, the CM could end up anywhere along the axle.



Contact patch — The physical tip-ground interface. A real-world contact patch always has a finite area, however small, but the patch of a fresh antenna tip on hard, polished ground nicely approximates a point. During spin-down, friction and rolling resistance act on the top only through the contact patch, and their magnitudes depend critically on the local properties of the physical surfaces meeting there.

Critical speed — The angular speed above which the spinning top is stable against gravity. A decelerating top may remain upright in a metastable state for some time after reaching critical speed, but it will then fall at the slightest provocation. Critical speed grows with specific TMI and relative CM height, decreases with specific AMI and tilt, and is independent of total mass. All other things being equal, the lower the critical speed, the longer the spin time.

Finger top — A spinning top delivering good play value when spun on the ground with a twirl or snap of the fingers alone. All the tops on this page qualify.

Ground — The solid surface supporting the tip of an upright top. Ground properties can have a huge impact on spin time and behavior. The ground most favorable to spin time is a polished, low-friction surface hard enough to prevent tip sinkage. The black fine-grained polished granite and biconvex lens below are excellent examples.





Ground clearance — The height of the top's landing zone above the ground when the stem is vertical. Together, ground clearance and landing zone radius determine the landing angle. Ground clearance goes directly to play value in unpracticed hands and is an important design consideration in any finger top. Not much clearance beneath the rotor of this asteroid top, and that makes it a difficult twirl for the unpracticed hand.



Landing — The instant any part of a tilting top other than the tip first touches ground. In broad precessing tops with little ground clearance, this may well occur before the top actually begins its fall.

Landing tilt — Tilt at the time of landing on a flat surface (not on a pedestal). The small landing tilts encountered in tops with broad rotors and little ground clearance leave little wiggle room for the unpracticed user. High AMI tops with landing tilts under 10° like the one below are generally the hardest to twirl to high release speeds. Landing tilt goes directly to play value in unpracticed hands and is an important design consideration in any finger top. That said, the tilt control added by most spin-up tools can easily overcome a landing tilt too small for a given user.



Landing zone — The circular ring of contact points first touching the ground on landing. The landing zone often follows the rotor's lower edge. Otherwise, it might lie on the underside of the rotor or on a badly designed tip assembly. The landing zone on this Round Up top follows the outer lower edges of the upright black and white panels.



Mass distribution — The way the mass elements (parts) making up the top are distributed laterally relative the spin axis and vertically relative to the tip, without regard for total mass. In tops, the most important measures of mass distribution are relative CM height, specific AMI, and specific TMI.

Mode — A quasi-stable behavior lasting for some time during spin-down or after landing. A mode emerges as a distinct combination of spin and either (i) gravity-driven gyroscopic precession about the vertical axis through the CM or (ii) horizontal rotation on the ground about that same vertical axis. Gyroscopic nutation occasionally adds a jerking motion to the precession. Modes are usually demarcated by abrupt transitions in behavior. LEGO® tops tend to have their own characteristic mode sequences.

Nutation — A particular kind of wobble of gyroscopic origin involving oscillation in tilt. The nutation rate is generally proportional to specific AMI and spin rate, inversely proportional to specific TMI, and independent of total mass. (Wikipedia page)

Overhand twirl — The usual method of launching a finger top via a stem twirled palm-down from above.



Precession — A gravity-driven gyroscopic rotation of the stem about a vertical axis. Whether this axis passes through the top's CM or tip depends on sliding friction and rolling resistance at the tip's contact patch. Precession is said to be "steady" when tilt is constant, but constant tilt is at best a useful fiction in real-world tops subject to spin decay. In practice, "steady" is also used when tilt varies very slowly without visible oscillation. (Wikipedia page)

Relative CM height — CM height divided by maximum rotor radius, an important measure of mass distribution divorced from absolute size. AKA "normalized CM height".

Release — The instant the twirling hand leaves the stem. Thereafter, the top's behavior evolves freely as spin decays prior to landing. Details of the release can have a huge impact on spin time and top behavior.

Release speed — Rotor spin rate at the moment of stem release. The release speed attainable by hand is an important factor in finger top spin time and varies with AMI, ground clearance, twirling skill, and practice. The dependence on AMI is highly nonlinear. With a practiced hand, release speed becomes roughly characteristic of the top. With a starter like this all-LEGO® planetary top starter with 1:16 overdrive, you can reach release speeds far beyond anything attainable by hand.



Release tilt — The stem's tilt at the moment of stem release. Keeping release tilt within the top's landing tilt can be hard when you're really cranking a finger top. You can improve your tilt control with a 2-handed starter like this black Twirl-o-matic.



Rotor — The widest component in a LEGO® finger top, and the one carrying most of its mass, AMI, and TMI. The rotor is typically situated between more or less distinct stem and tip assemblies, and the top's CM is usually located somewhere inside it. The smooth, dark gray biconvex rotor in this dish top is sleeker than most in the LEGO® realm.



Rotor plane — The transverse plane defined by the top's rotor and passing through the rotor's CM. In this dish top, the circular contact between the dark gray dishes lies in the rotor plane.

Self-righting — A spontaneous and progressive reduction in the tilt of a precessing top, often ending in a transiently vertical stem. The broader the tip, and the more friction at the tip-ground contact patch, the more likely the top is to right itself. However, most self-righting tops have a critical tilt beyond which self-righting becomes impossible.

Sleeper — A top spinning quietly with a vertical stem, generally with little or no travel. The cheeseburger top in the photo before last is a good example. Your odds of twirling a sleeper can go way up a 2-handed spin-up tool like the black Twirl-o-matic in the photo before last.

Specific AMI — AMI per unit mass, an important measure of mass distribution divorced from total mass. High specific AMIs generally translate into long spin times, low precession rates, and low critical speeds and tend to promote sleeping or steady precession.

Specific TMI — TMI per unit mass, another important measure of mass distribution divorced from total mass. Greater specific TMIs tend to translate into shorter spin times, faster precession rates, slower nutation rates, and higher critical speeds. High specific TMI also reduces willing to sleep and promotes nutation and other interesting behaviors.

Spin — Rotation about the top's rotational symmetry axis.

Spin decay — The roughly exponential loss of spin rate observed in real-world tops during the spin-down phase between release and landing. Spin decay results from braking torques due aerodynamic drag acting on the rotor and sliding friction and rolling resistance acting on the tip. Of these, the speed-dependent drag torque will generally be the most important at all speeds unless (i) tip friction or rolling resistance is exceptionally high, or (ii) critical speed is exceptionally low. Drag is also the main limiting factor in the release speeds attainable with high-speed spin-up tools. Release speed in turn limits spin time. The importance of drag in LEGO® top performance can't be overstated.

Spin time — The time elapsed between release and landing. Spin time is often longer than the time required for the spin rate to decay from release speed to critical speed, as the top may stay upright for some time after reaching the latter. However, it can be much shorter than the time to critical speed in stably precessing tops with small landing tilts.

Steady precession — Strictly speaking, rotation of the top's stem about the vertical at constant tilt. But constant tilt is at best a useful fiction in real-world tops subject to spin decay. In practice, the term is also used when tilt varies very slowly without visible oscillation. The rate of steady precession is generally proportional to CM height, inversely proportional to specific AMI and spin rate, and independent of mass. (Wikipedia page)

Symmetry axis — The top's axis of geometric rotational symmetry as seen from above with the stem vertical. The symmetry axis is almost always the intended spin axis.

Throwing top — A string-launched spinning top generally resembling an inverted pear or teardrop. AKA "peg top". I have yet to find a way to make a working LEGO® throwing top without glue. (Photo courtesy of Jorge Alcoz.)



Tilt — The angle between the vertical and the stem. When the stem is vertical, the tilt is 0°. Tilt can take on many values between release and landing but can't exceed the landing tilt on a flat surface. AKA "inclination", "precession angle".

TMI — Short for transverse moment of inertia taken through the tip, not the CM. TMI measures the top's resistance to angular acceleration about any transverse axis through the tip. It's proportional to mass and the square of maximum rotor radius and grows rapidly with axial rotor length and especially CM height.

TMI/AMI ratio — TMI divided by AMI, a very important predictor of top behavior divorced from total mass. AKA "moment ratio", "gyroscopic constant".

Transverse — Refers to any axis or plane perperpendicular to the top's symmetry axis. Hence, TMI measures the top's resistance to angular acceleration about any transverse axis through the tip. The plane defined by a rotor with at least 3-fold rotational symmetry is transverse by definition. In the gyrophonic tops below, the disks making up the rotors are all transverse in orientation.



Travel — Horizontal translation of the top's tip across the table. AKA "walking".

Twirl — To spin a top by hand with fingers applied directly to the stem (overhand twirl) or tip (underhand twirl).

Unbalance — In a top, an asymmetric distribution of mass about the spin axis. Rotating unbalance is the cause of the largely non-gyroscopic form of wobble known as whirl. In "static" unbalance, the top's CM fails to land on the spin axis. In "couple" unbalance, the principal axis of inertia comes to lie at an angle to the spin axis. In "dynamic" unbalance, the usual kind in real rotating machines but necessarily in LEGO® tops, static and couple unbalance coexist. In LEGO® tops, unbalance almost always stems from a deliberate design choice (below), a design error, or an unseated or missing part. In this statically balanced hyperbolic ring top, couple unbalance is inherent to the design.



Underhand twirl — A powerful way to launch a finger top by twirling its tip from below with a strong palm-up snap of the fingers. AKA "snap start".



Whirl — A particular form of wobble due entirely to rotating unbalance. Whirl is distinct from gyroscopic nutation. The engineering discipline of rotor dynamics is devoted to the study and elimination of whirl in rotating machinery. With some modification, the same principles apply to tops with unbalance.

Wobble — A generally unwanted variation in tilt due to nutation, whirl, or both. Non-gyroscopic causes include rotating unbalance, structural vibration due to inadequate stiffness, tip irregularities, ground irregularities, and less than smooth release.

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Comments

 I made it 
  August 3, 2017
Quoting Oran Cruzen Your tops are the tops my good friend! Thanks for the birthday wishes!
Very kind, Oran!
 I like it 
  July 7, 2017
Your tops are the tops my good friend! Thanks for the birthday wishes!
 I made it 
  June 19, 2017
It tickles me no end that the first-place raffle winner, a Frenchman known for his world-class top collection, chose this top kit as his prize. LEGO tops are on the map!
 I made it 
  May 26, 2017
Quoting jds 7777 If a larger, more comprehensive article exists on tops than this one, I would question that author's sanity :) I kept thinking those throwing tops looked familiar; then I realized I met a kid in Costa Rica once who had one. Having never seen one before, I thought it was pretty awesome! Never did get the hang of how to use one though.
But that was just the glossary! Wait till you see my "Treatise on the Esthetics, Physics, and Engineering of LEGO Spinning Tops". And even that will pale in comparison with "The Theory of the Top” published in 4 volumes over 1897-1910 by the famous German physicists Felix Klein and Arnold Sommerfeld. Throwing tops take a lot of patience and practice. I'm just learning, and it's going very slowly.
 I like it 
  May 26, 2017
If a larger, more comprehensive article exists on tops than this one, I would question that author's sanity :) I kept thinking those throwing tops looked familiar; then I realized I met a kid in Costa Rica once who had one. Having never seen one before, I thought it was pretty awesome! Never did get the hang of how to use one though.
 I made it 
  May 25, 2017
Quoting Craig Howarth Extremely creative! love the one with the mini figures :)
Thanks, Craig! That one's a big favorite at LEGO shows. That it hasn't walked off just shows that most LEGO lovers are good-hearted folk. Except maybe when shifting attention away from how much they're spending on the stuff. Not that I'd know anything about that personally.
 I like it 
  May 23, 2017
Extremely creative! love the one with the mini figures :)
 I made it 
  May 23, 2017
Quoting Nick Barrett A generous and educational prize for the lucky winner. Nice work!
Thanks, Nick!
  May 23, 2017
A generous and educational prize for the lucky winner. Nice work!
 I made it 
  May 22, 2017
Quoting Oliver Becker Another brilliant stuff presented in a brilliant way as you like to do here, my friend! :)
Too kind, Oliver!
 I made it 
  May 22, 2017
Quoting Clayton Marchetti That's really great of you to donate these awesome tops. I really like the color blending types. Excellent!
Thanks, Clayton! The ITSA is my top community. Shhhh! They don't know that top parts are cheap.
 I like it 
  May 22, 2017
Another brilliant stuff presented in a brilliant way as you like to do here, my friend! :)
 I like it 
  May 22, 2017
That's really great of you to donate these awesome tops. I really like the color blending types. Excellent!
 I made it 
  May 22, 2017
Quoting Doug Hughes Awesome! Spread the love of Lego to the top community too muoohahaha!!
Thanks, Doug! They'll never know what hit 'em!
 I like it 
  May 22, 2017
Awesome! Spread the love of Lego to the top community too muoohahaha!!
 
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