MOCpages : Share your LEGO® creations
LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet & Boeing F/A-18 Super Hornet
Welcome to the world's greatest LEGO fan community!
Explore cool creations, share your own, and have lots of fun together.  ~  It's all free!
McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet & Boeing F/A-18 Super Hornet
Rate it  12345       Add a comment Add a comment   Zoom in  Zoom in
Here is my interpretation of the McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet and Boeing F/A-18 Super Hornet. It is built to minfig scale, and has many interesting features and design elements. As always, leave a comment if you wish. Check out my flickr page for larger pictures here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/118702264@N05/. The LDD model of the F/A-18 variant is available on my Etsy site: www.etsy.com/ca/shop/KurtsMOCs.
About this creation

The McDonnel Douglas F/A-18 Hornet is a twin-engine supersonic, all-weather carrier capable multirole combat jet, designed as both a fighter and attack aircraft. The Hornet is in use with the United States Navy and Marine Corps, as well as by the air forces of several other nations. The Hornet has single-seat (A, C, and E) variants and tandem-seat (B, D, F, and G) variants.

In the 1990s, the US Navy sought to replace the aging A-6 Intruders and A-7 Corsair IIs. The McDonnell Douglas (later Boeing) F/A-18E/F Super Hornet was commissioned and flew in 1995 and entered service in 1999, replacing the Grumman F-14 Tomcat. Although based upon the original Hornet, the Super Hornet is 20% larger and has upgraded engines and avionics. Boeing is also working with Northrop Grumman to develop the Advanced Super Hornet, which employs reduced radar cross-section (RCS) and more powerful electronic jamming equipment.

Here, an F/A-18A from VFA-131 “Wildcats” returns to the USS Coral Sea after a training mission in the Atlantic. Formed in January 1985, VFA-131 was stationed at Naval Air Station Cecil Field in Florida and became the Atlantic Fleet’s first F/A-18 squadron. My models of the F/A-18 are built to minifig scale and have many operational features. Read on further as I go over them in greater detail.


The first prototype of the Northrop YF-17 flew on June 9 and the second on August 24, 1974. It spent the first year in a fly-off against the two General Dynamics YF-16 prototypes in the US Air Force’s Lightweight Fighter (LWF) competition. The YF-17, known as the Cobra, was an excellent aircraft but lost to the YF-16 and General Dynamics’ infrastructure and global reach. Having lost the contract, Northrop thought is saw its contender relegated to the history books of failed prototypes. As it turned out, the US Navy had other plans.

The US Navy started the Naval Fighter-Attack, Experimental (VFAX) program to procure a multirole aircraft to replace the Douglas A-4 Skyhawk, the A-7 Corsair II, and the remaining McDonnel Douglas F-4 Phantom IIs and to complement the Grumman F-14 Tomcat. In 1973, Congress mandated that the Navy pursue a lower-cost alternative to the F-14. Rather than building a new aircraft from scratch, the Navy examined the LWF fighters designed for the US Air Force. While both aircraft were exemplary, neither had been designed for a strike role.

The US Navy did not want a single-engine aircraft for naval deployment and announced the selection of the YF-17. Due to the different specification requirements between the LWF and VFAX, the Navy asked the successful naval aircraft manufacturer McDonnell Douglas to partner with Northrop and design a navalized version of the YF-17 known as the F-18 Hornet. Here, you can see the Cobra prototype conducting tests at Edwards AFB. Note the difference in the landing gear and simpler fuselage lines.


Although similar in appearance, the differences between the YF-17 and the F-18 were significant. The Hornet has a larger wing area with a greater span, a wider fuselage housing to carry more fuel, a larger Hughes APG-65 radar, twin wheel nose gear, and structural changes to withstand catapult and arrested landing. The twin engines were modified from bypass jets to turbofans, the pilot’s seat was changed to the Martin-Baker US10S, quad digital fly-by-wire flight controls drive both tail planes and ailerons for roll control, and the cockpit was completely redesigned so that three electronic displays replaced almost all conventional instruments. The material composition of the fuselage included a greater proportion of graphite epoxy composite, larger wing-root extensions were given axial slots to control airflow over the inner wing area, and folding wings for storage onboard a carrier.

The first YF-18 flew on November 18, 1978 and became operational in November 1980 with VFA-125 “Rough Riders” based at NAS Lemoore, California. The model has movable parts, including the flaps, ailerons, speed brake, landing gear, and canopy. I designed the model around a central “carcass” onto which various blocks could be added to assemble several Hornet variants.


The Hornet has a top speed of Mach 1.8 (1,190 mph at 40,000 feet). It can carry a wide variety of bombs and missiles, including air-to-air and air-to-ground, supplemented by the 20 mm M61 Vulcan cannon in the nose. The engines are two General Electric F404 turbofan engines, which give the aircraft a high thrust-to-weight ratio. The F/A-18 has excellent aerodynamic characteristics, primarily attributed to its leading-edge extensions. The fighter’s primary missions are fighter escort, fleet air defence, Suppression of Enemy Air Defences (SEAD), air interdiction, close air support, and aerial reconnaissance.

Flying through a rainstorm off the California coast, this Hornet belongs to VMFA-232 “The Red Devils” based at Marine Corps Station Miramar, California. The Red Devils can trace their lineage back to 1925 and flew in the South Pacific during World War 2, Vietnam, Operation Desert Storm, Iraqi Freedom, and Enduring Freedom. I designed the model to be built in a top half and inverted bottom half and connected internally with a series of reversing connections. I’ve done something similar on my CF-105 and MiG-25. This approach allows me to have the smooth profiles and surfaces on the top and bottom. Given the narrow width of the fuselage (four studs wide), it proved to be quite a challenge.


The Spanish Air Force (Ejército del Aire) ordered 60 EF-18A model and 12 EF-18B model Hornets (the “E” standing for “España,” or Spain), named respectively C.15 and CE.15 by Spanish AF. Delivery of the Spanish version started In November 1985 until July 1990. These fighters were upgraded to F-18A+/B+ standard, close to F/A-18C/D (plus version includes later mission and armament computers, databuses, data-storage set, new wiring, pylon modifications and software, new abilities as AN/AAS-38B NITE Hawk targeting FLIR pods).

This C.15 flies with 121 Squadron of Ala (Wing) 12 based at Torrejón Air Base near Madrid. Spanish AF EF-18 Hornets have flown Ground Attack, SEAD, combat air patrol (CAP) combat missions in Bosnia and Kosovo, under NATO command, in Aviano detachment (Italy) flying with Canadian and USMC F/A-18s. This image of the Hornet shows the smooth contour of the dorsal and nose line. Rather than have a stepped-plate profile, similar to my Su-35 or XB-70, I wanted to create a hybrid stepping-slope system in order to capture the F/A-18’s gentle lines. This approach, and accounting for the scale of the model, made for some tricky structural scenarios! In the end, however, the fuselage turned out to be soundly connected.


Canada was the first export customer for the Hornet, replacing the CF-104 Starfighter (air reconnaissance and strike), the McDonnell CF-101 Voodoo (air interception), and the CF-116 Freedom Fighter (ground attack). The Canadian Forces Air Command ordered 98 A models (Canadian designation CF-188A/CF-18A) and 40 B models (designation CF-188B/CF-18B).

The differences between the CF-18 and the US F-18 include the 0.6 Mcd night identification light. This spotlight is mounted in the gun loading door on the port side of the aircraft. Also, the underside of the CF-18 features a painted “false canopy” intended to momentarily disorient and confuse an enemy in air-to-air combat. Subsequent USMC and Spanish AF F/A-18s also adopted this feature.

62 CF-18a and 18 CF-18B aircraft took part in the Incremental Modernization Project which as completed in two phases. The program was launched in 2001 and the last updated aircraft was delivered in March 2010. The aims were to improve air-to-air and air-to-ground combat abilities, upgrade sensors and the defensive suite and replace the datalinks and communications systems on board the CF-18 from the F/A-18A and F/A-18B standard to the current F/A-18C and F/A-18D standard.

This Hornet flies with 410 (Operational Training Unit) Squadron based at CFB Cold Lake, Alberta. 410 Squadron can trace its origins back to the Battle of Britain and D-Day. Currently, the squadron usually trains between 20 and 22 pilots annually. These pilots include new recruits, foreign exchange officers, and former CF-18 pilots seeking recertification after a ground or exchange tour. Areas covered in depth in the Fighter Pilot Course (FPC) include basic and advanced aircraft handling, instrument flight, formation flying, night flying, all-weather interception, air-to-air refuelling, Basic Fighter Manoeuvres (BFM, or “dogfighting”) and air combat. The latter half of each FPC comprises academic air-to-ground weapons delivery and Close Air Support (CAS), as well as advanced Air Interdiction (AI) tactics, which is usually completed in the south-western United States due to better weather and the availability of bombing ranges.

On this model, you can see the “false canopy” built into the bottom of the fuselage. To get the bricks to align, I had to make some adjustments. Rather than use the sloped bricks that would maintain a clear landing gear space, I used the brick arches to maintain the smooth fuselage contour. It looks better for the image but won’t work in real bricks! An aesthetic compromise to get the right shot!


The F/A-18C and D models are the result of a block upgrade in 1987 incorporating upgraded radar, avionics, and the capacity to carry new missiles such as the AIM-120 AMRAAM air-to-air missile and AGM-65 Maverick and AGM-84 Harpoon air-to-surface missiles. Other upgrades include the Martin Baker NACES (Navy Aircrew Common Ejection Seat), and a self-protection jammer. A synthetic aperture ground mapping radar enables the pilot to locate targets in poor visibility conditions.

C and D models delivered since 1989 also have improved night attack abilities, consisting of the Hughes AN/AAR-50 thermal navigation pod, night vision goggles, and two full-colour (formerly monochrome) multi-function display (MFDs) and a colour moving map. Also, beginning in 1992, the F404-GE-402 enhanced performance engine, providing approximately 10% more maximum static thrust became the standard Hornet engine.

This Hornet flies with VFA-195 “Dambusters” squadron. I chose to use an unconventional Lego piece for the main landing gear strut. The Hornet’s landing gear has some complex geometry, which was difficult to model accurately with Technics pieces and carry the weight of the model. The front gear assembly was pretty straightforward, but the main gear needed stiffness in the connections and was small enough to fold back into the fuselage. The ball/cup beam gave me the structural rigidity and allowed for the proper geometry when the gear was extended and retracted. It looks weird but it does the job!


Kuwait had ordered 31 F/A-18C and eight F/A-18D Hornets before the outbreak of the Gulf War. After the conflict ended, the Kuwait Air Force phased out its inventory of A-4 Douglas Skyhawks and Dassault Mirage F-1s in favour of the Hornet. These new aircraft joined the 9th Squadron and 25th Squadron at Ahmad al-Jaber.

In order to get the camouflage patterns working, I have to break up the top and bottom overlapping single-stud width plates. These maintained the stability of the fuselage. I was careful to align the camo plates in such a way to keep the integral connections. This way, the model will stay together and there are no “floating” pieces. I tried to follow the original camo pattern, but obviously had to make a few adjustments!


The Finnish Air Force (Ilmavoimat) is a branch of the Finnish Defence Forces and founded on March 6, 1918. Its peacetime missions include airspace surveillance, identification flights, and the production of readiness formations for wartime conditions. After World War 2, the FiAF was restricted by the Paris Peace talks of 1947 to a small air force comprised mostly of Soviet aircraft. The FiAF also “stored” Swedish Saab 35 Drakens in the event of a war with the Soviet Union. With the Cold War over in 1990, the FiAF ended its policy of purchasing Soviet-Russian aircraft and replaced the Saab Draken and MiG-21 aircraft with the F/A-18C/D Hornets.

This Hornet flies with Fighter Squadron 31 stationed in Rissala, near Kuopio. In the place of the centre line fuel tank is an AN/AAQ-28(V)5 LITENING targeting pod. This advanced precision targeting pod significantly increases the combat effectiveness of the aircraft during the day, night, and under-the-weather conditions in the attack of ground and air targets. It uses a high-resolution, forward-looking infrared (FLIR) sensor and a CCD camera used to obtain target imagery. In addition to two wing-mounted fuel tanks, this payload configuration also includes six AIM-120 AMRAAM medium-range missiles and two AIM-9 Sidewinder short-range missiles.


The Swiss Air Force (Schweizer Luftwaffe) purchased 26 C models and eight D models, beginning in January 1996 until December 1999. In late 2007, Switzerland requested to be included in the F/A-18C/D Upgrade 25 Program to extend the useful life of its F/A-18C/Ds. The program includes significant avionics and mission computer upgrades, as well as the 20 ATFLIR surveillance and targeting pods, and 44 sets of AN/ALR-67v3 ECM equipment.

The Swiss Air Force operates from several fixed bases but its personnel are also trained to carry out air operations from temporary highway airstrips. In case of crisis or war, several stretches of road are specifically prepared for this option. The Hornet’s carrier-borne design were well suited to operations on short runways with steep take-offs.

This Hornet flies with Fighter Squadron 17 “Falcons” stationed Payerne Air Base, approximately half way between Lausanne and Bern. Just like the Canadian, Finnish, Kuwait and some US Marine Hornets, the Swiss variant carries the night identification light on the port side. Also note that the blue shaft of the AIM-9 Sidewinder indicates a training missile with an inert warhead and rocket motor.


This Hornet flies with VFA-127 “The Cyclons” Aggressor Squadron. Originally nicknamed the “Royal Blues,” VA-127 operated as the all-weather jet instrument and transition training squadron for pilots on the West Coast. In October 1983, the instrument training mission was dropped and the squadron became the Adversary Role (Dissimilar Air Combat Manoeuvring) flying from NAS Fallon, Nevada. In March 1987, the squadron was re-designated as a Strike Fighter Squadron, becoming VFA-127 (informally known as the “Desert Bogeys.” It was then disestablished in March 1996.


The Blue Angels are the US Navy’s flight demonstration squadron flown by Navy and Marine aviators. Formed in 1946, the six demonstration pilots currently fly the F/A-18C Hornet. The aircraft are all former fleet fighters that are maintained to nearly combat-ready status (apart from the paint scheme!). The Blue Angels select pilots and support officers based upon their application and flight records. Hornet pilots must have a minimum of 1,250 tactical jet hours and be carrier-qualified. Pilots serve two to three years and then return to fleet assignments.

The Blue Angels train and perform all year round. During winter training at NAF El Centro, California, pilots fly two practice sessions per day, six days a week, in order to fly the 120 training missions needed to perform the demonstration safely. In March, the team returns to their home base in Pensacola, Florida. The Blue Angels’ show season runs each year from March until November.

Here, Angels 5 and 6 perform an opposing knife-edge pass. To create the illusion of an in-line appearance for the spectators, the far aircraft is actually slightly higher than the near aircraft. In this image, I’ve taken a vantage point opposite of the spectator view to show the separation. Each Hornet has the weapons removed and replaced with a tank that contains smoke oil used in demonstrations. The control stick spring system is also outfitted for more precise aircraft control input.


The Royal Malaysian Air Force (Tentera Udara Diraja Malaysia, TUDM) was formed on June 2, 1958 as the Royal Federation of Malaya Air Force (RFMAF), however, its roots can be traced back to the Malayan Auxiliary Air Force formations of the British Royal Air Force in then colonial British Malaya in 1934. With the formation of Malaysian Federation on September 1963, the TUDM began taking control of former RAF and RAAF bases and aircraft. After the withdrawal of British military forces from Malaysia and Singapore in 1971, a five-nation agreement between Malaysia, Singapore, New Zealand, Australia, and the United Kingdom ensured defence against external aggression. The RAAF maintained two Mirage III squadrons at RAF/RAAF Station Butterworth, which were withdrawn in 1986.

With the withdrawal of British military forces, the TUDM underwent gradual modernisation from the 1970s to the 1990s. The TUDM purchased eight F/A-18D Hornets from March 1997 to August 1997 to provide all weather interdiction capability alongside the MiG-29N/NUB air superiority fighter and the Su-30MKM multi-role combat aircraft.

Getting ready for a training flight, these two D-variants fly with 18 Squadron at RMAF Butterworth near Penang. The Malaysian Hornets are renown for their dark paint scheme in contrast to the familiar, matte light grey colour of most F/A-18s. In this image you can see the folded wings, which vexed my design and building of this model. The leading wing edge of the Hornet is swept 20 degrees. There was only one Lego angled plate (4x8 stud, 23 degree angle) that was close. Using three plates would have made the wing too wide so I had to use two. If I wanted the wing to fold, it would occur halfway along the length of the wing, which was incorrect. For the standard model, the wings do not fold but have the correct leading edge angle. I also created a folding wing with the pivot in the correct place but the leading edge angle is too shallow (18 degrees). It appears in either scenario, I had to make a compromise. At least by making two wing assemblies, the builder can make their own decision!


Along with the standard, C and D model upgrades, an additional 60 D-model Hornets were configured as the night attack F/A-18D (RC) with the ability for reconnaissance. These could be outfitted with the ATARS electro-optical sensor package that includes a sensor pod and equipment mounted in the place of the M61 cannon. Each of the four US Marine Corps F/A-18D squadrons have three ATARS aircraft. The first operational use of ATARS equipped aircraft occurred in February 2000 during Operation Allied Force in Kosovo.

In this image, you can see an F/A-18D (RC) from the VMFA(AW)-225 “Vikings” squadron based at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar in California. The ATARS sensor package can be seen on the underside of the nose. I designed the M61 Cannon Pod and the ATARS Sensor Pod to be interchangeable.


Although both aircraft share the same name, the F/A-18E Super Hornet is a much different aircraft. Designed and initially produced by McDonnell Douglas, the Super Hornet first flew in 1995 and entered low-rate production in early 1997 with full production beginning at the end of the year. The Hornet and Super Hornet share many characteristics, including avionics, ejection seats, radar, armament, mission computer software, and maintenance/operating procedures.

Despite the similarities, the Super Hornet is largely a new aircraft at about 20% larger, reaching the same size and weight as the Air Force’s F-15 Eagle. The Super Hornet carries 33% more internal fuel and is equipped with an aerial refuelling system (ARS). The airframe was stretched almost three feet and possesses enlarged leading edge extensions (LEX) that provide improved vortex lifting characteristics in high angle of attack manoeuvres.

This Super Hornet belongs to VFA-31 “Tomcatters,” flying with CVW-8 onboard the USS George H.W. Bush. The Super Hornet is known on-deck as the “Rhino” in order to distinguish it from “legacy” Hornets (a term used to distinguish the earlier model and the new model). The Tomcatters flew extensive ground attack missions in Operation Inherent Resolve against IS targets in Syria and peacefully intercepted MiG-29s.

Due to the increase in size of the model, I was able to remedy a few design issues apparent in the “legacy” Hornet. The nose remained mostly the same but the rear fuselage and wings were expanded and revised. I also adjusted the leading edge root extensions, tail planes, and smaller other details, such as vents, air brakes, and new wing pylon mounts.


The Royal Australian Air Force ordered 24 F/A-18F in 2007 to replace its aging F-111C fleet. Intended to assume the F-111’s strategic/deterrent strike role until at least 2020, this interim replacement has been controversial. The first RAAF Super Hornet flew in July 2009 and arrived at RAAF Base Amberley in Queensland in March 2010.

No. 1 Squadron, known as the “Fighting First,” was formed in 1916 as part of the Australian Flying Corps. Flying in the Middle East in World War 1, Southeast Asia in World War 2, and during the Malayan Emergency during the 1950s, the squadron has seen extensive action including recent deployment in the Middle East against ISIL.

Here, you can see this Super Hornet loaded with three external tanks, two AIM-9 Sidewinders, and two GBU-10 Paveway II laser guided bombs. With the Super Hornet’s larger wingspan, I was able to get the wing to fold and use the 23 degree angled plate. The only compromise is that the pivot point is one stud too far inboard. Also, the underside of the fuselage tapers towards the nozzles. With a bit of extra room, I was able to insert some connectors in order to achieve a smoother profile.


The original tandem-seat “legacy” Hornet was intended only as a trainer. However, in addition to its training role, a “missionized” D-variant was also configured as an all-weather strike aircraft for the US Marines. The Super Hornet’s tandem-seat configuration retains the weapon systems officer (WSO) for the US Marines and the US Navy.

Catching the three-wire, this F/A-18F Super Hornet from Strike Fighter Squadron VFA-103 “Jolly Rogers” lands aboard the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower. The F/A-18F began replacing the VF-103 F-14B Tomcats in December 2004 and reassigned to Carrier Air Wing Seven (CVW-7). Re-designated VFA-103, the Jolly Rogers were deployed to support operations Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Freedom, and operations off the Somali coast. I’m not sure if F/A-18s use their speed brakes on carrier landings but this image was a good opportunity to show off what it looks like! Also, notice the new wing pylons and conformal fuselage mounts for the AIM-120 AMRAAMs.


The EA-18G Growler is a carrier-based electronic warfare aircraft, a specialized version of the tandem-seat F/A-18F Super Hornet. The EA-18G began production in 2007 and entered operational service with the US Navy in late 2009. Australia has also purchased twelve EA-18Gs, which enter service with the RAAF in 2017. The Growlers were procured by the US Navy to replace the Northrop Grumman EA-6B Prowlers, which were ending their service with the Navy. US Navy Growlers have seen combat in Operation Odyssey Dawn, in Iraq and Libya.

The RAAF Growlers are equipped with the AN/ASQ-228 ATFLIR (forward looking infrared) targeting pod and will also have additional air-to-air weapons in the form of the AIM-9X Sidewinder missile. The RAAF EA-18Gs are operated by No. 6 Squadron and are based at RAAF Base Amberley. In this model, you can see the jamming pods, wing-mounted fuel tanks, and AGM-88 HARM missiles. The M61 Cannon Pod is removed and replaced with a smoother fuselage profile.


The Growler’s flight performance is similar to that of the F/A-18E/F. This enables the Growler to perform escort jamming as well as the traditional standoff jamming mission. Growlers will be able to accompany F/A-18s during all phases of an attack mission.

The Growler has more than 90% in common with the standard Super Hornet, sharing airframe, Raytheon AN/APG-79 AESA radar and weapon systems such as the AN/AYK-22 stores management system. Most of the dedicated airborne electronic attack equipment is mounted in the space that used to house the internal 20 mm cannon and on the wingtips. Nine weapons stations remain free to provide for additional weapons or jamming pods, including AN/ALQ-218 wideband receivers on the wingtips and AN/ALQ-99 high and low-band tactical jamming pods. The ALQ-218 combined with the ALQ-99 form a full spectrum electronic warfare suite that is able to provide detection and jamming against all known surface-to-air threats.

Here, aircraft 543 of the Electronic Attack Squadron 132 (VAQ-132) “Scorpions” flies in support of ground attack forces. In addition to the ALQ-218 and ALQ-99 pods, this Phase 1 Growler carries an AIM-120 AMRAAM missile on the conformal fuselage station for self-protection along with two AGM-88 HARM missiles mounted on the outer wing pylons.


In this image, you can see how I designed the “legacy” Hornet to be adaptable to the single-seat and tandem-seat configurations, as well as other variant differences. The Hornet can be configured in a variety ways using the different seating arrangements, wing configuration, and armament, munitions, and avionics attachments. Rather than build several different models, I chose to design a system from which several variants could be derived.


The Super Hornet has a few less features than the “legacy” Hornet but relies more on the armaments, munitions, and avionics attachments to configure the correct variant. As mentioned earlier, the larger wing of the Super Hornet allowed me to add a folding mechanism to the 23-degree angle plates. This simplified the model considerably.


I broke down the armaments, munitions, and avionics for the “legacy” Hornet and the Super Hornet mostly because of the different wing and conformal fuselage mounts. Both aircraft deployed similar weapons but often the avionics were different. This image, along with the previous two, come from my F/A-18 Hornet and Super Hornet booklet. This can be found on my Etsy site along with the “legacy” Hornet and Super Hornet models.


I couldn’t resist putting my new Blue Angels Hornet model together with my Blue Angels “Fat Albert” Model! I took this project on as a commission for a follower of my work. Without his encouragement, I might never have found time to build this truly amazing aircraft. I’m glad I did! Many thanks to Wikipedia for the aircraft specifications and information used in my summary.



Comments

 I made it 
  March 10, 2018
Quoting john lamarck Well done Kurt.
Thanks, John!
 I like it 
  March 10, 2018
Well done Kurt.
 I made it 
  March 7, 2018
Quoting Henrik Jensen Fantastic presentation of the Hornet in all it`s development states. I really enjoyed reading though this amazing post, studying all your amazing F/A-18 models!
Thanks, Henrik! I'm glad you like the model and appreciate the historical research of the Hornet. Doing the research is half the fun of building these models!
 I like it 
  March 7, 2018
Fantastic presentation of the Hornet in all it`s development states. I really enjoyed reading though this amazing post, studying all your amazing F/A-18 models!
 I made it 
  March 2, 2018
Quoting Beni Henzen My current project is a ... F / A 18 C. This is an excellent reference document for building a moc. The exploded view is excellent and gives ideas for some details. Thank you Kurt for this amazing MOC.
Thanks for your support, Beni! I'm glad you like the model. Good luck on your version of the Hornet!
  March 2, 2018
My current project is a ... F / A 18 C. This is an excellent reference document for building a moc. The exploded view is excellent and gives ideas for some details. Thank you Kurt for this amazing MOC.
 I made it 
  March 1, 2018
Quoting Nick Barrett Fantastic post, I learned a lot and the model is beautifully done.
Thanks, Nick! I'm glad you like the model.
 I like it 
  March 1, 2018
Fantastic post, I learned a lot and the model is beautifully done.
 I made it 
  February 28, 2018
Quoting Jeremy McCreary Another tour de force in both modeling and reporting, Kurt! Never realized how versatile the F-18 is.
Thanks, Jeremy! I'm glad you like the model and post. The Hornets have proven themselves to be quite versatile but losing out in the new world of stealth-obsessive air forces. Time will tell if the F/A-18 can keep up with the F-35.
 I like it 
  February 28, 2018
Another tour de force in both modeling and reporting, Kurt! Never realized how versatile the F-18 is.
 I made it 
  February 27, 2018
Quoting Sputnik The Third This is fantastic. I get to see hornets fly almost daily and your model looks great. The grey bricks you used to separate the cockpit section however. I don’t know if they are integral to the construction or something but they do not really fit with the rest of the moc. I know real cockpits do have metal frames but they are much thinner. Any ways great moc
Thanks, Sputnik! I know what you're saying about the canopy's metal frame but it's a sacrifice at this scale.
 I like it 
  February 27, 2018
This is fantastic. I get to see hornets fly almost daily and your model looks great. The grey bricks you used to separate the cockpit section however. I don’t know if they are integral to the construction or something but they do not really fit with the rest of the moc. I know real cockpits do have metal frames but they are much thinner. Any ways great moc
 I made it 
  February 27, 2018
Quoting Mark B. Incredible work. The way you exhaustively include almost every known variation of the aircraft you build is mind blowing. What I especially like is that you seem to pay as much attention to the details underside as you do to those visible from the top or sides. You've inspired me to try to build an aircraft myself at some point.
Thanks, Mark! I like doing the background research and getting into the details. Getting all the variants for the Hornet wasn't too bad as there were only a few operators flying the aircraft. My building techniques have improved by following other expert builders, such as yourself, and I looked at ways to better finish the models. Sometimes, the underside of the aircraft is more interesting than the top! I would love to see an aircraft from your work desk; you've definitely inspired me to work on ships (stay tuned!).
 I like it 
  February 27, 2018
Incredible work. The way you exhaustively include almost every known variation of the aircraft you build is mind blowing. What I especially like is that you seem to pay as much attention to the details underside as you do to those visible from the top or sides. You've inspired me to try to build an aircraft myself at some point.
 I made it 
  February 27, 2018
Quoting BATOH rossi As always you did an exceptional job! I would have liked to see the Landing gear in greater detail. excellent MOC..and says one who has never loved the F18!
Thanks, BATOH! I'm glad you like the model.
 I like it 
  February 26, 2018
As always you did an exceptional job! I would have liked to see the Landing gear in greater detail. excellent MOC..and says one who has never loved the F18!
 I made it 
  February 26, 2018
Quoting Clayton Marchetti Beautiful job Kurt! I like how you included the painted cockpit on the underside of the Canadian version. Fantastic background info too. The blue angles are my favorite. Excellent job!
Thanks, Clayton! I'm glad you like the model and the information. Everyone loves the Blue Angels so it was a natural choice as a variant.
 I like it 
  February 26, 2018
Beautiful job Kurt! I like how you included the painted cockpit on the underside of the Canadian version. Fantastic background info too. The blue angles are my favorite. Excellent job!
 I made it 
  February 26, 2018
Quoting Seaman SPb Excellent work, Kurt! Blue Angels is my favorite!
Thanks, Seaman! The Blue Angels livery are always fun!
 I like it 
  February 26, 2018
Excellent work, Kurt! Blue Angels is my favorite!
 
By Kurt's MOCs
Add to my favorite builders

24
people like this. See who.

1,674 visitors
20 comments
Added February 26, 2018
McDonnell CF-101 Voodoo  You are at the end of this folder.
More from Kurt's
More across MOCpages
 


LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet & Boeing F/A-18 Super Hornet


You Your home page | LEGO creations | Favorite builders
Activity Activity | Comments | Creations
Explore Explore | Recent | Groups
MOCpages is an unofficial, fan-created website. LEGO® and the brick configuration are property of The LEGO Group, which does not sponsor, own, or endorse this site.
©2002-2018 Sean Kenney Design Inc | Privacy policy | Terms of use