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Baltimore TV Hill - Red Candelabra TV Tower
TV Tower
About this creation
The main photo is a Lego minifigure scale (but not to scale to the real world but rather a super deform version of a ) model of a Red Candelabra TV broadcasting tower at TV Hill Baltimore Maryland which is operated by and shared by WBAL TV(NBC) WMAR TV (ABC) and WJZ TV(CBS). The Lego version of this TV tower is slightly over three feet tall. The TV tower in the real world is 970 feet tall. This Lego Tower was made for a Washington Metro Area Lego Train Club (WamaLTC) display as part of the "Holiday Train Garden" exhibit that will be running from November 23 2018 to January 6 2019 at the Balimore & Ohio (B&O) Railroad Ellicott City Station Museum, the oldest standing train station in the USA. This model had a height requirement of 3 to 4 feet due to the display area available. The major design build challenges was (1) the triangular cross section of the tower and its platform and (2) stability due to the high center of gravity caused by the large antenna tower platform and the low vibrations that the display area would face because of a nearby active freight rail road track.

Below is a photo of the TV tower in the real world which was initially erected in 1959.
[1]



Note that the real world Baltimore TV Hill tower and this Lego model are divided into three sections by two platforms that stick out on the side of the tower.

Below is a photo of the top of the tower. While the tower itself has an equilateral cross section, the top antenna platform is really an isosceles triangle - but only slightly so by one stud...This Lego design is missing the FAA navigational lights that are required in the real world version.




Below is a photo of the ground level of this Lego tower - there is not much detail here because I have run out of time to add more detail...I'm already late with delivering this MOC to the exhibit. .You can see the ground level of the real world TV Hill tower on the internet by visiting Google maps and searching for "3723 Malden Ave, Baltimore, Maryland, USA." Google provides a satellite view and 360 view street of this site. In the real world there are three red transmission cable metal cage conduits that spring out of each of the three sides of the tower going to three different buildings that looks sort of like roots of a tree. The Tower also is protected by a tall fence.





Below is a photo of the tower looking up



Below is a photo of the tower down up



This MOC would not be possible without the help of Bricklink and the vendors on bricklink who sold me the parts I needed. Thanks soo very much!

This model will be upgraded for a Lego display by Classic Plastic Brick in Baltimore Maryland (Maryland State Fair) for the first week of August in 2019. Upgrade will include increasing the TV tower's height by adding Tuned Mass damper (TMD) [2]


[1]

A tower of power rose up above city Structure: The Candelabra like transmission tower atop Television Hill completed in 1959, improving TV reception for thousands.
by Fred Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun. September 21, 1997

http://articles.baltimoresun.com/1997-09-21/features/1997264146_1_tower-of-power-transmission-tower-barnard


[2]

The real world Baltimore TV Hill tower used guy lines to keep it stable from high winds and other vibrations, but this is not possible for the Lego display so another approach is needed as the tower center of mass gets increasingly higher. Instead I will be using earthquake resistant mechanism called a Tuned Mass Damper to keep this tower upright. A wikipedia explanation can be found here...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuned_mass_damper




Comments

 I made it 
  December 6, 2018
Quoting Jeremy McCreary Excellent bit of LEGO structural engineering, Walter! You =might= be able to make a crude PF transmitter with a PF battery, IR receiver, and enough PF extension cables to reach top of tower, where loose end might act as a dipole antenna. Since receiver output is DC with pulse width modulation (PWM) applied, loose end of cable might emit a signal echoing the PWM waveform, which you'd control with your IR handset. How you'd pick up signal, I don't know, and it might not work at all.
Elenco Snap Circuits now has Lego connectors that in theory could be used to integrate Snap Circuit components into a Lego model. Snap circuits are all running off three AA batteries - so any transmitter signal would be weak..
 I like it 
  December 6, 2018
Excellent bit of LEGO structural engineering, Walter! You =might= be able to make a crude PF transmitter with a PF battery, IR receiver, and enough PF extension cables to reach top of tower, where loose end might act as a dipole antenna. Since receiver output is DC with pulse width modulation (PWM) applied, loose end of cable might emit a signal echoing the PWM waveform, which you'd control with your IR handset. How you'd pick up signal, I don't know, and it might not work at all.
 
By Walter Lee
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LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop Baltimore TV Hill - Red Candelabra TV Tower Buildings


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